The ToadStool Table


wtnhighlander

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This project is awesome I really dig the look of the table and it came out great. Sloped floors and tables are unfortunate. I can imagine how long I'd spend trying to get it perfectly level for it to be rotated slightly and send me into leveling mode again...

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2 hours ago, Chestnut said:

This project is awesome I really dig the look of the table and it came out great. Sloped floors and tables are unfortunate. I can imagine how long I'd spend trying to get it perfectly level for it to be rotated slightly and send me into leveling mode again...

No kidding. I plan to level the pedestal from above, before bolting on the top (easy way). That keeps the 'skirt' as close to the floor as possible. If it gets moved, someone will have to lie on the floor and jack the bolts up enough to use a wrench from underneath.

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Ross, really impressed with the base and your ingenuity. Hopefully you applied for a patent on your spin-a-ma-jig and a copy right on the name before you published pictures. I’d hate to see a similar version in Rockler’s catalog in 6 months without you getting credit for it. What is the size of Cody’s former play place? 

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Ken, the shed is 12x20, but has a 4' front porch, so the interior is only 12x16. Nice thing is that I added several electrical outlets, all connected by conduit. Its a single circuit for now, but easy to pull in new wire for more circuits, 240volt, etc. It is also fully insulated and sheetrocked, so temp swings are minimal. A couple of 4' LED lights really make it bright. Much better than the garage, just cramped for making larger pieces like this. To rip an 8' board, I would need to open a window...

The only real downside is that the table saw won't fit through the door in one piece, so I can't roll it outside and use nature's dust collection for cutting MDF.

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1 hour ago, wtnhighlander said:

Ken, the shed is 12x20, but has a 4' front porch, so the interior is only 12x16. Nice thing is that I added several electrical outlets, all connected by conduit. Its a single circuit for now, but easy to pull in new wire for more circuits, 240volt, etc. It is also fully insulated and sheetrocked, so temp swings are minimal. A couple of 4' LED lights really make it bright. Much better than the garage, just cramped for making larger pieces like this. To rip an 8' board, I would need to open a window...

The only real downside is that the table saw won't fit through the door in one piece, so I can't roll it outside and use nature's dust collection for cutting MDF.

I know the feeling. My first shop here was 9 X 16 with 4' used for storage, that left me with a 9 X 12 interior.  Tight as all hell, but I managed to make a bunch of stuff in and outside that little hell hole.  I feel your pain..

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Here is the jig setup for "turning" the inside of the ring.

 

20200326_050753.thumb.jpg.147ceb9fe889395e5f49b2d103df3ecf.jpg

 

The ring is tall enough to max out the height of the blade at this angle. I didn't want to flip the ring over, because I don't want screw holes to show, and I am not perfectly confident that double-sided tape would hold it securely. I may try the blue tape &CA glue approach later, or even try a waste glue block as one might use on a lathe. 

Anyway, I was left with a small "ledge" of un-cut material around the bottom edge, since the bottom is facing up during the cut.

20200326_053122.thumb.jpg.c39faef4cc05f1651b0a5743ff2d935a.jpg

 

I just whittled that away with a utility knife.  So far, it almost fits the pedestal, but not quite:

20200326_054123.thumb.jpg.9a335e9480c6da205fec2c02220c0526.jpg

 

I may just break out my spindle sander to finish it up. It will end up a little over-sized, so I can line it with felt and still have it not tighten up before it reaches the floor.

Just for giggles, I uploaded a short clip of the jig in action. Watch you volume - I masked the saw noise with music, but it may still be a bit loud.

 

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I am not sure if this has any significance, but you tube wanted to follow your demo with an interview with The Three Stoogies.  :D

OK kidding aside, and I know you are alert, aware and carefull, but it wouldn't take much of a lapse to put your hand into the blade.  Is there any way to build in some sort of guard or "reminder".  How about a knob on top of that 2x4 your turning?

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@Mark J, I have been thinking of how to improve version 2.0. A knob would be very helpful. When the work is oriented to spin clockwise, I can use the wing nut on top of the 'axle' bolt, but that doesn't work the other way. The safest way to use it for now is to pull or push the work from the opposite side of the axle, but I had difficulty doing that while holding the camera to shoot that demo. Shortcuts...always a bad idea. Should have set up a tripod.

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Progress is slow, not much time in the shop. I filled the grain (just on the top) with plaster of paris. For those unfamiliar, this is an old technique used by piano makers. Moisten a rolled cotton rag (t-shirt) with water, dip it into the PoP powder, then rub in in like waxing a car. After it dries, clean the surface with the same or next higher grit.

20200401_045810_HDR.thumb.jpg.c29fa4a1464a62a6f6cacc4ac370a9a3.jpg

Red oak has enormous pores, so a single application isn't glassy smooth, but adequate in this case. The plaster left in the pores becomes rather translucent with oil-based clear finish, or will absorb pigment to enhance the grain contrast when stained.

 

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The profile of this edge is a big part of the design. I'm at the final stages of sanding, trying to keep the top edge as crisp as possible. How much would you guys "break" the top edge? It is about 80* to the top face, and very crisp at the moment. I want to keep the crispness, but not have it feel too sharp, since it is the edge that will be most felt when the table is in use.

I'm thinking a light tough with 320 on a sanding block. That sound reasonable to you?

20200405_111300.thumb.jpg.1123c8a940aacd5e1e356b3e8884ab84.jpg

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That's a quandary. That's the most vulnerable part on the whole piece. It's going to get the most wear, but it's also the most visible place for that nice edge to show. I think I'd do it with 320 just to maintain more control over how much is coming off. Only you can decide how much is enough.

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