Workbenches


Recommended Posts

  • Replies 72
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

Top Posters In This Topic

Popular Posts

All of these benches are "alright" compared to my $150 harbor freight bench!!

I love this thread. I also really like my Roubo. I've already done a thread on it. But here's a couple of pictures for you all.        

Thanks!   It is..  Just wish I'd of made better wood and vise selections.   It will always be in my shop as it was my first build.  Was also my first attempt at MT joinery as well.

Posted Images

...

 

I second (third?) the support for reading Chris Schwartz's work bench book (as well as Anarchist Tool Chest). It's a great book and got me fantasizing about building a Roubo eventually.

 

 

 

No "t" in Schwarz!!  :P

 

I like the flooring in your shop!

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

I completed my split top Roubo in August, but went straight into a bathroom remodel after that. That's the price my wife demanded in exchange for the time and $$$ spent on the bench. I'm only slightly disappointed that I haven't built anything with it yet; a bathroom remodel is well worth the price of admission for me... Except for the freaking drywall finishing. Does mudding drywall drive anyone else insane??

post-2195-0-63193500-1378778249_thumb.jp

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

I could write a chapter in a book on drywall, starting with the framing of the house specifically for it.  I hate it too, and spent 35 years figuring out how to do it well in the least amount of time.  Make sure none of your first coat is too high, 18" concrete trowel to run taped joints, prime the wall ( to prevent any damage to the paper face from sanding)  before the finishing coats (don't put any primer on it if ANYTHING is too high), shine a light across it close up to see imperfections to finish.

 

Doing woodwork as part of what I do for a living, I rarely do it for fun on the weekends, so my workbench is make-do...for now.  Mine gets moved from job to job, so it starts as the small Lervad 5' portable one that was purchased new in 1977 for $199.  It's too light for any heavy planning, but it makes a good base, and handy for all sorts of small stuff.  I put one corner against a wall near a North facing window to keep it from moving against planing.

 

For this job in the picture, I have a 2x  8' long on top of the Lervad against a dog.  The tailvise is pushing against a block screwed underneath to help stabilize it against the dog down by the shoulder vise.  A half dozen 4 penny finish nails keep the strip of wood I'm making a matching piece of molding out of from sliding sideways.  A roller support holds the end of the 2x that's off the bench.

 

I do have plans in my head, and some parts for a large bench, but have no idea when I'll get around to finishing it.  This serves the purpose when I need it.

 

This was a cold day,  but a roaring fire in the 200 year old fireplace made it a good room to work in that day.

 

http://www.historic-house-restoration.com/images/novdec2012_018.JPG

Link to post
Share on other sites

I got this bad boy in the mail today and will be starting a joinery bench soon. Funny story, during checkout I accidentally selected my wife's name in PayPal. Today the box showed up addressed to her and I am sure you can imagine her disappointment when she look inside and saw the Moxon Vise.  

post-104-0-69835500-1378800428_thumb.jpg

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

Here is the workbench that I built a few weeks back.  My goal was to use up some materials I had on hand, so it is a mix of various wood.  I knew this would not be my final bench, so I just wanted something functional.  I must tell you I really like it, and it is working out well for me.   The base is from my old workbench which was my Grandpa's.  The base is old 2/4 lumber, I added some pieces of construction lumber to make it more solid and heavy.  

 

The top is laminated, 3/4" mdf on bottom, 1" of Ply in middle, and 3/4 mdf on top, with a replaceable hardboard top. I edged it out with some oak that I had laying around for awhile.

 

I am very happy with it.  It is heavy, flat, and solid.   After over thinking and researching, I decided I just needed something functional as quickly as possible.

 

I guess my dog wanted to say hello, he refused to move out of the picture.  

post-14301-0-26402500-1378811815_thumb.j

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Very cool! I really like the Moxon vise idea. It makes me think about abandoning the twin screw Veritas vise and building a traditional Roubo bench. I can have the best of both worlds! :)

I just need to order a bunch of hardware from Benchcraft and get at it!

Link to post
Share on other sites

Very cool! I really like the Moxon vise idea. It makes me think about abandoning the twin screw Veritas vise and building a traditional Roubo bench. I can have the best of both worlds! :)

I just need to order a bunch of hardware from Benchcraft and get at it!

Put it by your curb, I'll be there in 20 minutes to pick it up. I won't even charge you for special disposal fees.
  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

==> From a practical standpoint why does the blue one have value?

 

The Blue book coincides with CS's 'Roubo journey' at PopW.  Chris got heavily into work-holding, hand tool workflow, bench design, the writings of Roubo, etc between 2005 and 2007 -- much of his blog/PopW writing from that period coalesced into the Blue book.  Perhaps the Blue book would be better titled, "Zen in the art of Roubo"...

 

Agreed, from a 'practical standpoint', it's not as pragmatic as the Red book...  But if you're interested in why a bench evolved as it did, then it's a good read...  Maybe it appeals to the Engineer in me -- the Blue book got me thinking about work-holding in ways that I had not --- for instance, aligning the legs with the top to create a workholding face..  hadn't considered that... or how it could influence a hand-tool workflow...

 

But if you already have a good foundation in hand tool workflow and work-holding, then the Blue book may not be of interest...

Link to post
Share on other sites

==> From a practical standpoint why does the blue one have value?

 

The Blue book coincides with CS's 'Roubo journey' at PopW.  Chris got heavily into work-holding, hand tool workflow, bench design, the writings of Roubo, etc between 2005 and 2007 -- much of his blog/PopW writing from that period coalesced into the Blue book.  Perhaps the Blue book would be better titled, "Zen in the art of Roubo"...

 

Agreed, from a 'practical standpoint', it's not as pragmatic as the Red book...  But if you're interested in why a bench evolved as it did, then it's a good read...  Maybe it appeals to the Engineer in me -- the Blue book got me thinking about work-holding in ways that I had not --- for instance, aligning the legs with the top to create a workholding face..  hadn't considered that... or how it could influence a hand-tool workflow...

 

But if you already have a good foundation in hand tool workflow and work-holding, then the Blue book may not be of interest...

 

I was actually after the Anarchists Tool Chest when I bought the blue book. The store I had a voucher for only had this one on offer. I had stumbled upon Chris' tool chest concept accidentally when browsing online and it hit me. All of a sudden It snapped into focus what I enjoyed (from an enthusiast/hobby/amateur perspective) about woodworking. 

Reading the book was fun and enlightening. I did not know about the French bench or that we Brits are known for our aprons. I am yet to find a woodworker, who for me gets the balance with fun/hand tools/history/journey/quality quite like he does. That's not to say I agree with everything or that I worship the dude. One thing is for sure you are lucky to have someone like him promoting woodworking, we don't have anyone of his profile here.

Back to the point the blue one is useful if you are starting out. It's quite comprehensive, plans to make two good benches and lots of useful info on wood choice. Like anything, there is nothing "new" it's just done very well.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

That's me, I'm just starting out.    

With so many benches covered in the book, with the pros and cons of each I couldn't see the value in even looking at the blue one.  The 2 benches (and their options) in the blue book appear as works of art.  I want to reproduce period furniture so maybe that is influencing my view of workbenches.  And maybe I have a naive point of view that is common in newbies!

 

A newbie has so many distractions with so many options and ways of doing things.  

So I guess there's a fine line between doing a healthy dose of research, and driving yourself nuts trying to learn so much and taking the fun out of woodworking.  

 

I really like the power tool work bench with its out-feed/assembly table all-in-one, but I really want to build just one bench.  

 

Thanks hhh and G S, I appreciate the insights, it gives me some things to consider and think about.  

And I agree about Chris...he has a way of getting across to the reader that's very motivating. 

 

   

Link to post
Share on other sites

==> With so many benches covered in the book, with the pros and cons of each I couldn't see the value in even looking at the blue one.  The 2 benches (and their options) in the blue book appear as works of art.  I want to reproduce period furniture so maybe that is influencing my view of workbenches.  

 

All benches have their pros/cons... If there were one perfect bench, there wouldn't be much of a discussion or any books --- we'd all simply have 'the perfect bench' -- whatever it happened to be...  

 

If you want to move away from theory and 'just do it', I'd go Roubo or Scandinavian.. After doing all the research and reading the theory, that's where I ended-up...  I spent a decade or so with each.. the're  both good... When the Guild went with a Roubo bench, I replaced my existing two 'anemic Roubos' with the more robust model Marc was building...  After a year with that Roubo, I really can't see too many shortcomings (as long as you add a crochet, Moxon and a 2-gang outlet box on each stretcher for routers/et al).  These add-ons get you much of the functionality of the Scandinavian bench and recognize the utility of power tools in the hybrid workflow....

Link to post
Share on other sites

After living with the little Lervad for so long, when I get around to building the big bench it will have a tail vise that spans the width of that end, and a row of dogs on each side of the bench.  I end up using that vise probably more than the shoulder vise. 

 

Someone gave me a 30" x 8' laminated maple butcher block with no end joints and all top grade Maple that I'll use for the main part of the top, and I bought some German 40mm linear bearings off ebay, legs are here, but now I just need some spare time. 

post-14184-0-90440500-1378901266_thumb.j

post-14184-0-80629300-1378930898_thumb.j

Link to post
Share on other sites

==> What advantage does the crochet have?

 

There is a debate as to weather or not the crochet is redundant with the leg vice...  The answer is, it depends (of course)...

 

In CS's blog, he debates against another experienced craftsman (I forget who) on the utility of a crochet -- it's a good read...  Unfortunately it's early in his blog and would take some effort to get the thread -- think it's in late '05 or early-to-mid '06...

 

Basically, it depends on what you want to plane...  If the stock/component fits above the leg vice screw, then a crochet is of no use.  If you regularly plane wide stock, panels, doors, etc then a crochet is quite useful...  I built a bunch of doors (about 15) for my home and a crochet came in handy...

 

Note: the crochet is on Roubo's original bench...

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

  • Who's Online   0 Members, 0 Anonymous, 172 Guests (See full list)

    There are no registered users currently online

  • Forum Statistics

    29431
    Total Topics
    398822
    Total Posts
  • Member Statistics

    22185
    Total Members
    3644
    Most Online
    Harry1962
    Newest Member
    Harry1962
    Joined