Chestnut

TV Stand

Recommended Posts

That should look great in Cherry !

I would love to see those choke cherry slabs, I've never seen or worked with it. Has it been drying long ?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
18 minutes ago, wdwerker said:

That should look great in Cherry !

I would love to see those choke cherry slabs, I've never seen or worked with it. Has it been drying long ?

Umm i bought it in March it had been drying about 6 months at that time so I'd say it's been sitting a year. I measured it not that long ago around 12% Which is awfully close to the EMC of my shop right now. I'm only using the chokecherry for the top and i plan to give it ample room to expand and contract. The slabs are all pretty stable as well there isn't noticeable movement across the 20" wide slabs.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Cherry is popular these days.  Seems like everyone is working with it.  Maybe it's a knee-jerk reaction to the disgusting walnut bandwagon.  At least I think that's what's happening to me, and Mike has said the same.  I'm on the home stretch of a cherry low entertainment cabinet myself.  Sorry, no journal on this one.

Looks like a good project, The Nut.  I'm interested to see what the chokecherry looks like. 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Mike. said:

Yep.  I still love walnut but so many people are on the bandwagon the price is going up and the quality down.  I have a nice stash of boards I will use for a credenza in my living room, but after that it will be all cherry and maple for a while.  Exotics are becoming more interesting as well.   Compare the price and quality of Sapele to Walnut and Sapele wins without a question.  

Heck Honduran Mahogany is essentially the same price as walnut at my local dealer. $10.15 vs $9,50 for walnut both are s3s 4/4. I might be wrong on that price maybe it was $15, I'll have to check.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Pickup is fixed. Spare bedroom's joint compound got sanded and still had a spare out for shop time. I got the curved pieces rough cut on the bandsaw and then used the template to route them out. I have a lot of interest in this piece from family so i might be making a couple over the years.

14457533_10101115039379279_5449122877324

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

While i was sanding drywall joint compound, it's a terrible task, i was wondering what i was going to do with the shelf above the drawers I'd like it to be cherry looking so my thought was cherry ply. my local cabinet shop only carries 1/4" which isn't thick enough. Could i glue the cherry ply to some 1/2" BB ply and use that or would that cause problems? Can anyone suggest other options?

The shelf is going to be 39" x 22.25". The cherry ply is sold in 4x8 sheets and is MDF core. It's not cheap either obviously but i forgot how much i want to say $40. I uploaded a quick model i made to show that you'll she the shelf from not only the front but also the sides.

TV Stand-Temp0003.jpg

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Laminating engineered products should be fine, neither one is going to move much. That 1/4" ply is cheaper than shipping veneer, which is the other option I can think of.

I like the look you're going for here. I'll be keeping an eye on this journal.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
30 minutes ago, BonPacific said:

Laminating engineered products should be fine, neither one is going to move much. That 1/4" ply is cheaper than shipping veneer, which is the other option I can think of.

I like the look you're going for here. I'll be keeping an eye on this journal.

The other option is dealing with the pitfalls of solid wood. A solid panel would be about 6 BF + 15% waste at $5.75 it's only $40. I don't really need the strength of the shelf so i could free float it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Technically gluing 1/4" ply to 1/2" ply is unbalanced construction and could cause issues. I wouldn't recommend it.

Sent from my SCH-I545 using Tapatalk

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yeah sapele is a few bucks cheaper than walnut for me, and genuine mahogany is the same as walnut... Makes more and more sense everytime I look....

Sent from my Nexus 5 using Tapatalk

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Just caught up up on this and will be following.

 

Crush the PE exam! What field of engineering do you work in?

The drawing in the first post leans me toward mechanical. But if mechanical, you forgot your GD&T.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

3 layers of 1/4 ply would be balanced, orient the center sheet 90 degrees to the face layers. You could even use some birch, maple, whatever for the center layer. Clamping without a vacuum bag is a whole nuther discussion ! You could use mine but it's a hell of a drive.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
7 hours ago, MattF said:

Just caught up up on this and will be following.

 

Crush the PE exam! What field of engineering do you work in?

The drawing in the first post leans me toward mechanical. But if mechanical, you forgot your GD&T.

Civil, thought i probably should have done mechanical. I've had more then half a mind to go back for a masters in mechanical a few times. The thought of having student loans again keeps me well enough away.

6 hours ago, wdwerker said:

3 layers of 1/4 ply would be balanced, orient the center sheet 90 degrees to the face layers. You could even use some birch, maple, whatever for the center layer. Clamping without a vacuum bag is a whole nuther discussion ! You could use mine but it's a hell of a drive.

Yeah after thinking about it last night i remember my hardwood guy selling some "rustic" grade cherry for considerably less. I can't remember the actual grade of it but it was $2 BF less expensive i might just go solid and  free float the shelf on dominos. I'd have 1/4" to 3/8" of expansion across 24" which if my research is right the widest setting the domino should be able to handle.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have a question for the wood movement experts out there. Mid project the humidity in my house took a wild swing downward. I went from about 55% to 40% in my shop over a 2 day span. Should i hold off on milling parts and let the wood acclimate to the new humidity or will the couple days be good enough? It's all kiln dried 4/4 lumber.

I did a little joinery work to decompress from work before studying for my exam at the end of the month. I'm waiting for a good amount of time to mill the panels and glue the sides up. I'm hoping that will be tomorrow.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.