Chestnut

TV Stand

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I always try to do final milling just prior to use if I can.  If you're building with wood movement in mind then, you should be fine.  The wood is going to move whether it's assembled or not.

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37 minutes ago, TIODS said:

I always try to do final milling just prior to use if I can.  If you're building with wood movement in mind then, you should be fine.  The wood is going to move whether it's assembled or not.

I guess i should have said to minimize differential wood movement that would cause excessive cupping warping bowing ect.

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2 minutes ago, Chestnut said:

I guess i should have said to minimize differential wood movement that would cause excessive cupping warping bowing ect.

If you are constantly waiting for lumber to re-acclimate to your shop when humidity changes, you'll never get anything done.   

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50 minutes ago, Chestnut said:

I have a question for the wood movement experts out there. Mid project the humidity in my house took a wild swing downward. I went from about 55% to 40% in my shop over a 2 day span. Should i hold off on milling parts and let the wood acclimate to the new humidity or will the couple days be good enough? It's all kiln dried 4/4 lumber.

I did a little joinery work to decompress from work before studying for my exam at the end of the month. I'm waiting for a good amount of time to mill the panels and glue the sides up. I'm hoping that will be tomorrow.

 

When in doubt, plan for the worst. Calculating changes in dimension is pretty easy.

Using Understanding Wood by R. Bruce Hoadley as a guide, the shrinkage factor (S) for flat sawn cherry is 7.1% (page 117). For North Dakota, the extremes in equilibrium moisture content (MC) are 4% to 10%. The formula for the calculation is:

Change in Dimension = Dimension (beginning) x S(hrinkage factor) x (change in MC / .28) 

Assuming your cherry is flat sawn, the change will be the beginning dimension x 7.1% x (.06 / .28)

For a 6" piece the change will be .09" or roughly 1/10" over the year. Figure on 1/8" to be safe.

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1 hour ago, micks said:

When in doubt, plan for the worst. Calculating changes in dimension is pretty easy.

Using Understanding Wood by R. Bruce Hoadley as a guide, the shrinkage factor (S) for flat sawn cherry is 7.1% (page 117). For North Dakota, the extremes in equilibrium moisture content (MC) are 4% to 10%. The formula for the calculation is:

Change in Dimension = Dimension (beginning) x S(hrinkage factor) x (change in MC / .28) 

Assuming your cherry is flat sawn, the change will be the beginning dimension x 7.1% x (.06 / .28)

For a 6" piece the change will be .09" or roughly 1/10" over the year. Figure on 1/8" to be safe.

Thanks i was going to use 1/2" to play it safe now that i know it's only 1/8" my design is way over kill. Maybe I'll change it a bit tomorrow. Thanks for the expansion factors i have a few other places i need to calculate movement.

1 hour ago, TIODS said:

If you are constantly waiting for lumber to re-acclimate to your shop when humidity changes, you'll never get anything done.   

I guess i figured a 15% swing in 1 day might be a bit bigger of a deal then the few percentage points that change normally on a daily basis.

Progress to be made tomorrow thanks for all the help guys!!!

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7 hours ago, Chestnut said:
7 hours ago, Chestnut said:

Thanks i was going to use 1/2" to play it safe now that i know it's only 1/8" my design is way over kill. Maybe I'll change it a bit tomorrow. Thanks for the expansion factors i have a few other places i need to calculate movement.

That's 1/8" per 6" of width or 1/4" per foot.

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Just catching this journal now - looks great!  Looking forward to the next segment.

Looks like you used a cad drawing.  Do you prefer cad over sketchup?

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1 hour ago, Pug said:

Looks like you used a cad drawing.  Do you prefer cad over sketchup?

Sketchup is CAD.

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1 hour ago, Pug said:

Just catching this journal now - looks great!  Looking forward to the next segment.

Looks like you used a cad drawing.  Do you prefer cad over sketchup?

I use autodesk products because they are what i know best. It's also helpful because that is what is installed on my work computer. I've been bumbling through autocad and civil 3d for the last 12 years or so.

11 minutes ago, drzaius said:

Sketchup is CAD.

I'd argue that it's more of a 3D modeling program. I know the lines between them get fuzzy but AutoCAD and SketchUp do VERY different things. I don't really know that you could do a whole lot of true drafting in SketchUp.

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11 hours ago, Chestnut said:

I use autodesk products because they are what i know best. It's also helpful because that is what is installed on my work computer. I've been bumbling through autocad and civil 3d for the last 12 years or so.

I'd argue that it's more of a 3D modeling program. I know the lines between them get fuzzy but AutoCAD and SketchUp do VERY different things. I don't really know that you could do a whole lot of true drafting in SketchUp.

What you say is true, but CAD is a very broad term that encompasses pretty much any computer program that is used to create drawings or models, is it not?

Those panels are just gorgeous. Can't wait to see them with some finish on. Of course, photos can never do figure like that justice.

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@Mike. @drzaius I guess i hail from the era where CADD had a double dose of Ds and stood for computer aided drafting and design. Recently when they dropped the D i thought they dropped the design and kept drafting. I'm no expert on this if i had my way I'd vote death for AutoCAD and would use ESRI ArcMap all day long. My first post is my idea of drafting, later i posted a model and that's my opinion of 3d modeling. I see the 2 differently just like i don't consider pickup's, trucks it's a opinion on semantics and i know I'm probably wrong  ... !

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4 hours ago, Chestnut said:

@Mike. @drzaius I guess i hail from the era where CADD had a double dose of Ds and stood for computer aided drafting and design. Recently when they dropped the D i thought they dropped the design and kept drafting. I'm no expert on this if i had my way I'd vote death for AutoCAD and would use ESRI ArcMap all day long. My first post is my idea of drafting, later i posted a model and that's my opinion of 3d modeling. I see the 2 differently just like i don't consider pickup's, trucks it's a opinion on semantics and i know I'm probably wrong  ... !

Ha! How old are you? I come from a land before computers... I have never seen the two D version except in college course titles. 

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It must be a regional thing. I'm a young buck at 28 but I've been doing CAD stuff between school and work since like 2001. I worded it era for a reason, someone probably got smart in the early 2000s and added another D for reasons our good friend Mike pointed out above.

I know I'm not crazy and just made this up because i still have an email from our company telling everyone that promotional material was changing from CADD to CAD along with all titles and people needed to adjust accordingly. Other wise I'd boil it down to some mental fantasy i created, which would be terrible. Who creates fantasy's  about CAD? That just sounds like a nightmare.

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When I first got into the business (50 years ago) it was CADD - Computer Aided Design and Drafting. The original companies in the field were startups such as Calma, Computervision and Gerber Scientific. The technology was basically built around digitizers connected to CRT's to provide an interactive environment. Some of the larger companies such as IBM and Control Data had internal development programs using large interactive CRT's, but the small startup companies ruled the roost.

The equipment was applied to a variety of disciplines such as Electrical Schematic Drafting, Printed Circuit Layout, Mechanical Drafting, Architecture, etc. The systems were primarily drafting systems and had the ability to drive numerically controlled machines for creating parts and for creating the masks for etching printed circuit boards. 

This was before the days of PC's and the systems were supported by time shared mainframe computers by mini computers sold by Data General, Digital Equipment or Hewlett Packard. System prices were tens of thousands of dollars per workstation.

Over the years the drafting part of the name was dropped and the industry adopted CAD as it's identifier.

 

 

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56 minutes ago, Mike M said:

This was before the days of PC's and the systems were supported by time shared mainframe computers by mini computers sold by Data General, Digital Equipment or Hewlett Packard. System prices were tens of thousands of dollars per workstation.

Over the years the drafting part of the name was dropped and the industry adopted CAD as it's identifier.

Good info that explains why I only saw it on college course descriptions. Universities with engineering focus were likely the only ones using such computers at the time other than big companies. PC blew up big while I was in school and the early PC suites were not necessarily drafting friendly and were more truly just design suites. Thanks for chiming in. 

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