Chestnut

TV Stand

Recommended Posts

Just now, Chestnut said:

Went to the lumber yard today to inquire about some cherry 3/4" ply for the component shelf. The ply they have is pretty nice but i almost pissed myself laughing when he told me the price. They wanted $65 for a 4x4 sheet!  $65!

They're right on the money.  We sell full sheets for $129.

It's true that buying hardwood can actually be cheaper, especially when it's available for $2.90/bf.  It always makes sense to buy hardwood if hardwood makes sense.  Sometimes you just need ply though, depending on the situation.

Walnut is $140 but with the cost of walnut hardwood it's closer to a wash.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Just now, Eric. said:

They're right on the money.  We sell full sheets for $129.

It's true that buying hardwood can actually be cheaper, especially when it's available for $2.90/bf.  It always makes sense to buy hardwood if hardwood makes sense.  Sometimes you just need ply though, depending on the situation.

Walnut is $140 but with the cost of hardwood it's closer to a wash.

I suppose if you want it for stability as well. The stuff was 7-9 plys with 2 of them being thick MDF.

For walnut i can see it being worth while just not having to deal with the potential for as much waste. A sheet of ply isn't going to have checking and won't have rough edges like solid wood will.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
16 hours ago, Chestnut said:

I suppose if you want it for stability as well. The stuff was 7-9 plys with 2 of them being thick MDF.

For walnut i can see it being worth while just not having to deal with the potential for as much waste. A sheet of ply isn't going to have checking and won't have rough edges like solid wood will.

That's called Goldply here which is more expensive but has a smooth void-free surface for under the hardwood veneer face. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I stole some time away from studying for the PE to work on the shelf and stand in my shop staring at wood for a while. It just felt good to stare at something that wasn't a 3" thick book of equations.

Ran out a bunch of dominos for the panel. Used 4mm because edge grain strength isn't crucial and this shelf isn't going to support much weight to boot.

14721476_10101138599060489_5566989592006

In da clamps.

14706833_10101138599080449_1248906008238

While i was wood staring i found the wood that i wanted to use from the front arch and drawers. I decided against the designed drawers and am instead going with a completely flat face and will do half blind dovetails to join the front to the sides.

14692154_10101138586615429_9296829597738

What's that hiding over there?

14713041_10101138586585489_8091824978571

That auto on feature and adjustable suction is something that i never expected to be so awesome.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks guys for the comments. I'm excited at how well this is coming together. There are a couple mistakes but nothing that wasn't fixable.

I got the slabs out of their storage area and cut 1 edge to get a book match. I thought i was going to have to use 3 pieces to get the width i wanted but it looks like I'll be able to get it out of 2. I'll take better pictures of them after i flatten them with the router sled.

10221611052.jpg

I'm sure you can see that this was a crotch (upside down) and that there is a crack forming where the branches split. The crack doesn't go all the way through one but does on the other. Would the butterfly inlays or bow ties help keep it from spreading? I'll will epoxy it as well.

Does any one have a good resource for learning how to inlay those? I've wanted to try inlay for a while now and I've done a couple new techniques on this project might as well add more right?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yes, butterflies and epoxy will limit the crack from getting worse. Practice on scrap before you tackle those crotches. Cut out some butterflies and play with the layout to see what looks good to you. I think at least 2 per crack.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
27 minutes ago, Eric. said:

(Please say no.)

Ditto.

It doesn't fit the style of the base... But, it's your piece. Don't say we didn't warn you! :) 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
6 minutes ago, Eric. said:

That's looking good, Nut.  Nice looking cherry, good figure.

For the dutchman, just look up how to do a freehand inlay with a router.  You'll wanna go a bit deeper than a standard ornamental inlay, but the concept is the same.  Marc has an old video on the free site.  Piece o' cake.

Are you planning to use those slabs live edge for the top of this cabinet? (Please say no.)

No and not even because you asked so nicely :D. Slabs and live edge my have their place but this is NOT that place.

3 minutes ago, Llama said:

It doesn't fit the style of the base...

Sweet I've watched that before and that is what got me interested in inlay to begin with. I didn't know if these were done the same way as regular inlay.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 hours ago, Llama said:

You are spared. For now :) find something else for that slab!

Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

I think his intent is to use the slab without the live edge?

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Probably off topic, but would a cyanoacrylate (instant/super glue) work as well to fill these cracks as epoxy?  I have a somewhat similar (slab with cracks) project coming up, so I'll be interested to know how your approach works.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Filling cracks is probably not a good application for CA glue. Maybe the really thick kind could work, but the expense would be high, and it might set too quickly to avoid bubbles and gaps in the fill.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
8 hours ago, Pondhockey said:

Probably off topic, but would a cyanoacrylate (instant/super glue) work as well to fill these cracks as epoxy?  I have a somewhat similar (slab with cracks) project coming up, so I'll be interested to know how your approach works.

It takes a lot of epoxy to fill the cracks, it might be possible but it would be far from economical i think. Also tinting the CA glue would be difficult and i'm not sure how large voids filled with it would look.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Just as there are multiple types of other glues, epoxy and CA glue are offered in many types.  Generally speaking, when priced by volume, CA glue is one of the most expensive glues out there.  It has minimal gap-filling performance and I would leave that job to a high-solids PVA product designed for the task or to a general use epoxy if the repair (or rather the gap being repaired) will be seen.

Depending on the size, location or use case, filling gaps in hardwoods generally calls for some elasticity.  If the "fix" is non-structural a quicker cure epoxy is suitable.  Speaking as a generalization, the faster the cure, the weaker the bond for curing-types (as opposed to drying-types) of adhesives.  For colored gap filling in hardwoods a relatively weaker bond (still hell-a-strong) is fine so I take advantage of the faster cure.  Not only can I continue working sooner but, any tenancy to 'go where I don't want it'  is reduced.

 

All that aside, I am lovin' the look of this thing so far.  Keep on keepin' on.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, Chestnut said:

It takes a lot of epoxy to fill the cracks, it might be possible but it would be far from economical i think. Also tinting the CA glue would be difficult and i'm not sure how large voids filled with it would look.

Not so. Easy to find examples of guys doing this on video. Bulk marine epoxy is a big buy in, but you have lots left that lasts a long time. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On ‎10‎/‎21‎/‎2016 at 5:26 PM, Chestnut said:

Got a little bit more work done today. I needed some shop time to clear the mind.

I find it interesting how different people use their shop time. For some, it's their version of a zen rock garden, it brings peace. Others have to have music playing. I've even seen people with a TV in their shop. If I had a TV and table saw running at the same time, I'd be losing appendages left and right. I can tolerate music playing if I'm doing a repetitive task like sanding that requires no real precision. But if I am measuring, marking, and cutting; I prefer the sound of silence. I make far fewer mistakes without the distractions. And zen? God no. I find that if my head isn't clear, I need to stay away from the shop. Different strokes for different folks.

The piece looks fantastic, I'm a big fan.

-E

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.