krtwood

Homemade 12" Jointer

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This is going to be interesting.  Way out of my league, but interesting.  Keep us posted.

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This is going to be an interesting build I'm excited to follow this one along. I agree with you assessment of the lunchbox cutter-heads. The small diameter makes them slightly undesirable and if you are goign to put the effort in you might as well do it "right". I think the cast iron wing idea is a good one there have been many times that I've browsed used tools to possible salvage some parts to use to make something different. I ended up not buying anything but that's because other aspects of life got in the way and i had to put projects on hold.

Some day I'm goign to make a large belt sander so i hope you are ok with me borrowing what ever ideas i can from you.

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13 hours ago, Ronn W said:

This is going to be interesting.  Way out of my league, but interesting.  Keep us posted.

The woodworking part of it should be pretty straightforward and the metalworking part - well I had never even used a cutoff wheel before so if I can do it, you can do it.  But then I've cut my teeth in building tools with things like a drum sander.  A little less intimidating spinning sandpaper than carbide.

 

5 hours ago, wtnhighlander said:

At least Instagram makes sense now. You had me worried for a bit! :lol:

That's pretty much why I started this.  It's hard to follow along a build on Instagram if don't catch every post.

 

1 hour ago, difalkner said:

Can't wait to see this progress through the stages and to see the finished jointer.  Gonna' be cool!

Have you seen this build? http://www.thecncwoodworker.com/jointer.html  You may have every step already lined out but I like seeing how others do their builds on things like this.

David

Yes, I saw that one.  The aluminum bearing blocks are interesting but I have an easy solution for that.  Because I'm using a cutterhead designed for a jointer I can just order the bearing blocks for that jointer for about $40.  No need to reinvent the wheel when a manufacturer has already solved the problem for you.

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4 hours ago, Chestnut said:

This is going to be an interesting build I'm excited to follow this one along. I agree with you assessment of the lunchbox cutter-heads. The small diameter makes them slightly undesirable and if you are goign to put the effort in you might as well do it "right". I think the cast iron wing idea is a good one there have been many times that I've browsed used tools to possible salvage some parts to use to make something different. I ended up not buying anything but that's because other aspects of life got in the way and i had to put projects on hold.

You also get twice as much carbide for about 75% more money, so there's that.  But in value terms I could have used the table saw motor if I used the lunchbox head so it's way way more money in the short term.  I'm sure I'll use that motor for something else though eventually.  Plus more cutters means not having to rotate the cutters as often and I am all about not having to touch anything setup wise on the jointer for years and years.

 

Quote

Some day I'm goign to make a large belt sander so i hope you are ok with me borrowing what ever ideas i can from you.

Of course, that's why we share what we do.

 

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14 hours ago, krtwood said:

I could have used the table saw motor if I used the lunchbox head so it's way way more money in the short term.

This is true but if the table saw was in as rough of shape as it was you'd have a higher chance of needing to replace that motor sooner than later. Also at 12" wide a 3 hp motor might be better suited. I guess you never mentioned what you are goign to use for the motor did you? Are you doing video of this?

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You really have taken on a large task. The requirements and accuracy required to get a good finished project for this build is mind blowing. You seem to have the knowledge and desire for this build. A really great project. John

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11 hours ago, Chestnut said:

This is true but if the table saw was in as rough of shape as it was you'd have a higher chance of needing to replace that motor sooner than later. Also at 12" wide a 3 hp motor might be better suited. I guess you never mentioned what you are goign to use for the motor did you? Are you doing video of this?

True about the motor on the saw.  If nothing else it's good to have it as a backup to the motor on my saw.  When I did the motor bearings on mine I put a Grizzly motor in its place so I could open it up and find out what bearings it needed without having to put it back together while I waited for them to come in.  The saw did not like that Grizzly motor one bit.  It bounced around and made the saw vibrate like crazy.  So good to have the exact same motor around if I need it.

I'm probably going to get a Grizzly 2 hp motor, since I'm ordering the cutterhead from there and the bearing blocks.  It has the advantage of theoretically being able to run on a 110 20a circuit.  I don't have any 220 in the shop except for the dust collector.  But that circuit has most of the shop lights on it too so I can't expect to fully load that motor and not trip the breaker.  I plan to extend the circuit the dust collector is on, since I won't be hooking the jointer up to DC it can run on that circuit.  But at least I can test it on 110 until I get around to that.  I'll have my eye out on craigslist to see if a suitable motor turns up though.  There is a 2 hp motor on there now out of a Shop Fox molder but it's not reversible either.

10 hours ago, Check Twice said:

You really have taken on a large task. The requirements and accuracy required to get a good finished project for this build is mind blowing. You seem to have the knowledge and desire for this build. A really great project. John

Thank you, though I think you overestimate the requirements a bit and I get to follow in the footsteps of more experienced people than me.

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I may have overestimated the build but when walking into unknown territory (even with a guide) there has to be desire and skill on your part. I still think you have done a fine job and a build I have never tried. Have a fine day and a better tomorrow. 

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17 hours ago, krtwood said:

True about the motor on the saw.  If nothing else it's good to have it as a backup to the motor on my saw.  When I did the motor bearings on mine I put a Grizzly motor in its place so I could open it up and find out what bearings it needed without having to put it back together while I waited for them to come in.  The saw did not like that Grizzly motor one bit.  It bounced around and made the saw vibrate like crazy.  So good to have the exact same motor around if I need it.

I'm probably going to get a Grizzly 2 hp motor, since I'm ordering the cutterhead from there and the bearing blocks.  It has the advantage of theoretically being able to run on a 110 20a circuit.  I don't have any 220 in the shop except for the dust collector.  But that circuit has most of the shop lights on it too so I can't expect to fully load that motor and not trip the breaker.  I plan to extend the circuit the dust collector is on, since I won't be hooking the jointer up to DC it can run on that circuit.  But at least I can test it on 110 until I get around to that.  I'll have my eye out on craigslist to see if a suitable motor turns up though.  There is a 2 hp motor on there now out of a Shop Fox molder but it's not reversible either.

That's a good plan. I suppose beings that you don't have the motor yet you haven't been able to determine if the inrush current at startup will be able to be handled by a 20 amp breaker. The 2 hp motor i have that is wired for 120v trips the breaker 50% of the time just spinning up the motor. Adding a load like a cutter head may make it not function on 120v so something that might need to be checked. That said i ran a 2hp harbor freight DC on 120v and never had a circuit trip. I wonder if those DC motors would be able to be used for a tool and if so i wonder how cheap you can get a decent HF DC for used. I sold mine for $100 and it was gone in 45 min.

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Drew makes a good point. All single-phase motors are not created equal. Different starting methods allow for different inrush current situations.

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If it trips then I'll have more incentive to run the 220.  I am just not looking forward to getting to the box the Clearvue is hooked into which is buried behind the filter stack in a tight closet.  I doubt the HF DC motor is reversible.  I still have my 1.5 hp DC kicking around and looked at that too and it's not reversible either.  

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You could consider adding a gear drive to one of those motors to reverse direction of the driven load and allow you to place the motor where you want. A simple 1:1 gear between motor and belt drive is all you need. Cost of the added bearings, shafts, and gears is probably less than a new motor.

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