Walnut Prices Climbing


MisterDrow
 Share

Recommended Posts

12 minutes ago, JosephThomas said:

What does 'civilian' mean in this context? Is that the non-contractor / non-business rate, or the wholesale rate or something? Have not heard that term used before... My yard just does x% off the marked prices for contractors, so I'm a little confused.

Sounds like he is getting the contractor or high volume pricing. 

And welcome back JT

 

Yeah, walnut prices are stupid. If you want the why, gargle Shannon's write up. This has been going for a few years. Soon the fad will be over and poplar with it's beautiful muddy colors will come into fashion and things will change again.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

19 minutes ago, JosephThomas said:

What does 'civilian' mean in this context? Is that the non-contractor / non-business rate, or the wholesale rate or something? Have not heard that term used before... My yard just does x% off the marked prices for contractors, so I'm a little confused.

Sorry... I work for a custom manufacturing company and we buy a LOT of wood product from this local yard. As an employee, I am allowed to go to the yard and buy lumber for personal use (they even let me make stuff to sell on my own, too!) at the pricing that my company gets. I asked the guy at the yard what the pricing would be if I just walked in off of the street and he said it's over $12 now.

19 minutes ago, Mike. said:

Red Walnut is still affordable around here, right @Eric.

Ooh... I don't think I've ever seen red walnut before. Gotta google that.

4 minutes ago, Eric. said:

Red steam-dried blackened California eastern walnut is dirt cheap.  It's sopping wet and looks like pine.  Good stuff.

 

@MisterDrow ...let's compare apples to apples.

Your 4/4...what's the grade?  Is it rough or surfaced?  Kiln dried?

4/4 FAS kiln dried. Surfaced (partially, depending on the board) on the faces, edges are rough.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

4 minutes ago, MisterDrow said:

4/4 FAS kiln dried. Surfaced (partially, depending on the board) on the faces, edges are rough.

So FAS kiln dried, S2S, assuming skip-planed.

Just as a reference, ours is FAS kiln dried, S3S, sanded to 150...we're at $7.90/bf.  We also have 5/4 rough kiln dried (steamed) for $6.90/bf.  Also a stack of the FAS S3S all 12" and wider that sells for $12.00/bf.

The fact that we're in the midwest will usually mean slightly cheaper walnut prices than you guys out west...and I'd say the $7.96 price for what they're selling is about right for the market.  $12.00/bf for that same stock is highway robbery.  I would not pay that unless it was heavily figured and perfectly clear.

Buy cherry. :)

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

These are about 9-12" in width... probably about 8-10" usable once you mill the edges and remove the unevenness. Very nice figure in a lot of the boards. Really good stuff all around but I'm glad I get the volume discount because there's no way I'd pay $12+/bdft out of my own pocket.

I love going to that yard, though, because you can't go back to the lumber stack, they load up the lumber stack on huge fork lifts and bring it out to your car at the warehouse entrance. You can then just pick through the pile to find what you want, they measure it, you pay and you go. Super nice guys, there, too.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Those are excellent widths, and if they're not full of sapwood and defects I think you're actually getting a great price.  I also prefer S2S to both rough and surfaced S3S because you can still see exactly what you're getting yet you retain most of the thickness.  I assume those boards are 15/16" in thickness?

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share