Fusion 360 - Chisel Rack - Tutorial


Llama
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1 hour ago, pdacey08 said:

Great vid, lots of good info. Where did you see that you can get it free if you're just a hobbyist? I only see a free "trial" version or a monthly/annual subscription.

The annual is free if you're a hobbyist or if your company makes less than 100K a year. It's been a while since I registered, so I don't recall the specific steps... I think you just declare a free version, and every year they make you re-new. 

Edited by Llama
I can't think... Brain.... foggy...
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That was definitely a neat video! You’re getting damn better bud. But that stuff is way over this old mans head. As I’ve mentioned before, if I can’t lay it out on a Big Chief Tablet and a #2 pencil, it has to be configured on the fly.

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20 minutes ago, difalkner said:

Actually, it's hobbyist or you make less than 100k per year.  I wouldn't qualify the other way... ;)

If you keep stepping through the registration process you'll see where you can declare these things.

David

Oops... Typo :) Thanks! 

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17 minutes ago, K Cooper said:

That was definitely a neat video! You’re getting damn better bud. But that stuff is way over this old mans head. As I’ve mentioned before, if I can’t lay it out on a Big Chief Tablet and a #2 pencil, it has to be configured on the fly.

That's close to the way I do everything.   I don't think I've drawn anything in over a year, and then only one corner of a shutter project to get the proportions right (said close because that was on brown builders paper).  A client asked me last week if I had a to-do list.  I said, "Yeah.  In my head."

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19 minutes ago, Tom King said:

That's close to the way I do everything.   I don't think I've drawn anything in over a year, and then only one corner of a shutter project to get the proportions right (said close because that was on brown builders paper).  A client asked me last week if I had a to-do list.  I said, "Yeah.  In my head."

Got drawings? Yeah, snap a pic when I’m finished if you want documentation’s! ;)

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Great vid! In my previous job I used AutoCAD every day how ever that was a while ago. I struggled thru leaning Sketchup a few years ago as an alternative and have gotten decent at it. I want to try 360 since it feels more in the AutoCAD universe (a lot of the same keyboard shortcuts that are melted into my brain) but as each year passes it takes me longer to learn something new.

Do people use this for large projects or is this more for small parts?

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2 hours ago, estesbubba said:

Mel have you used Sketchup, and if so, how do the products compare?

I use them both... I use Sketchup for projects that use sheet goods because I like the cut list extensions. Fusion 360 for mostly everything else.

As far as a comparison, I enjoy using Fusion 360 more than SU. For me, it's more intuitive.

1 hour ago, Alan G said:

Great vid! In my previous job I used AutoCAD every day how ever that was a while ago. I struggled thru leaning Sketchup a few years ago as an alternative and have gotten decent at it. I want to try 360 since it feels more in the AutoCAD universe (a lot of the same keyboard shortcuts that are melted into my brain) but as each year passes it takes me longer to learn something new.

Do people use this for large projects or is this more for small parts?

I got my start the same way, AutoCad -> Inventor -> Solid Works/Rhino, etc.... -> Fusion

Fusion can be used for anything... small or large. Very large.

 

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Finally had the opportunity to watch the video, Mel, and it really helps with getting started into the parametric world of Fusion 360.  I have several designs I usually have to modify each time there's a change and this is what I have needed to start using more of what Fusion 360 offers.  I knew it was possible but had not taken the time to learn anything about it.

David

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You've pretty much convinced me to invest the time to learn Fusion 360. The parametric features alone are worth it. I'll be teaching a CNC for Fine Woodworking course next semester using Aspire, because that's what the college has. Good software, but pricey for the average small or hobbyist shop. With F 360 being free for most, maybe I'll roll it into the course next fall.

Thanks for putting this up. I look forward to the next one!

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  • 2 weeks later...
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1 minute ago, TheAverageCraftsman said:

I am going to have to make some time for your videos.  The little I've used Fusion 360, I really dig it but I just havent committed to it yet.  SketchUp frustrates me to all end so I am looking to make the switch.

Thanks! If you need any other videos, let me know!! 

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  • 3 weeks later...

So I have decided that I would like to learn Fusion 360 and spent about 3-4 hours trying to learn.  The first 2 hours was just opening up and trying to create something.  Then I watched the video Mel did and followed along.  This helped but I'm not sure if my sketchup knowledge is a problem or not.  There were certain things I wasn't able to replicate or follow along with.  The grid layout is a bit confusing compared to SU.  Maybe those versed in F360 could tell me if they set basic parameters (defaults) for dealing with wood (material was metal) and tool bar preferences.  I know I will need to download a lot of the wood species.  I can see some of the advantages of F360 vs SU and that is intriguing to me.  So after my rambling, I guess I will just keep trying, and see what I can learn from videos online.

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I have yet to download any wood species.  I just build the model, create the toolpath, and go cut on the CNC.  I know what wood I'm cutting and haven't seen the need for my models to look like wood.  Now, I have entered my own tools in the Tool Library and set the speeds/feeds to suit what I normally cut, which is Walnut about 90% of the time.  But all of my models look like this whether I'm cutting Walnut, Maple, Cherry, MDF, or in the case of this Longworth chuck I'll cut in a few days, Baltic Birch -

5a82e9ae10cbd_001-Longworthchuck.thumb.jpg.a231843d41bd306c0f6801935e5ff1a3.jpg

David

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