derekcohen

Entry hall table for a niece

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4 hours ago, curlyoak said:

Nice work. I enjoyed the narrative with the pictures. Did you intend to cut the mitres a little fat? Cleaning up the mitres I think would be easier then the rest of the joint. 

Thanks Derek!

I agree, that’s what I’d shoot for I think. 

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4 hours ago, curlyoak said:

Nice work. I enjoyed the narrative with the pictures. Did you intend to cut the mitres a little fat? Cleaning up the mitres I think would be easier then the rest of the joint. 

Thanks Derek!

Thanks CO. 

The mitres do need to be cut fat at first since I wish to avoid the danger of over-cutting them. It is safer to pare the waste, and if you are going to do this anyway, a smidgeon of fat there in the beginning does not matter. Plus, in the current build it is not possible to undercut/pare the mitres to make them fit. The reason is the inside edge on the model calls for a bevel/mitre all the way around. I plan to do a slight cove. An undercut would open up the mitre from the inside, and any undercutting would show.

Regards from Perth

Derek

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Derek, the fit before your last paring looked good to me. Your attention to detail is obviously something I personally need to better develop. :) 

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Your builds are giving me some great ideas. I'm going to be starting on some modernish style furniture in the near future and will be reference your build frequently. I Just want to say thanks ahead of time.

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10 hours ago, Tom King said:

I'm surprised that you would have ever even considered doing it the "easy" way :D.

This one may even have enough natural bling to compete against applied bling in that oddly judged competition.

And thank goodness he doesn’t normally do it the easy way, not that I could ever apply it. But then again, I learn things when he does it the easy way. 

Looking great Derek. 

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On ‎11‎/‎3‎/‎2019 at 10:50 AM, derekcohen said:

Most imagine that the value of a slider lies with cross-cutting. It certainly is so. However it is the rip using the slider - rather than the rip fence - which is so amazing.

One side of each board was to be ripped on the slider, before being jointed and resawn. Ripping on the slider is such an advantage with life edges. No jigs required. No rip fence to slide against. Just clamp the board on the slider, and run it past the saw blade. The long sliders can complete the rip in one quick pass. It occurred to me that I should take a few photos of ripping to width since the boards are longer than the slider. 

Here you can see that it comes up short ...

Resaw10.jpg

 

Just catching up on this project. Fantastic and inspiring work as always, Derek. Thank you for sharing.

On this cut, I always hear the guys at the lumber mill call this a straight line rip cut. They have a special saw that is purpose built for this function, but the principle is the same. 

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Derek, your last post showing the drawer fronts from the single board. How did you cut this, with a taper jig or on the bs and then to the jointer. 

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Coop, I simply used the bandsaw freehand close to the line, than planed to the line, and the table saw for the parallel cut.

Regards from Perth

Derek

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The dividers seem obvious now that you pointed it out. Hard to be critical of your work, Derek, I think we were all still looking at the case and not thinking past it. But - it’s sitting on your bench with time to think about it, and obviously you have :) The corrective actions are sublime.

The drawer fronts look quite thick, is that 8/4 wood?

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Much better solution for the drawer dividers, getting the grain running with the top and bottom is something you really needed to do. You could have gotten away with the other setup if you just glued the front edge of the dividers and left the rest floating in the dado. Because you are covering the dividers with your drawers you would have been ok (no end grain showing that would look out of place), but you still would have the issue of expansion and possible buckling of the case. I like the change to getting the grain matching the top and bottom of the case. 

I am still concerned long term with your side pieces you glued on to the ends of the case. I know you built in some room for expansion, but I'm worried such a large area glued up cross grain like that may cause other problems. Mainly cracking or splitting of the sides of your case since the sides will not be able to expand horizontally. Also the top and bottom are not restricted like the sides so you'll have differing expansion and contracting going on with the sides and the top and bottom. Early in my woodworking development I've paid dearly for gluing areas cross grain like that. 

Do you think it's possible to plane off those pieces without ruining what you have done so far? Don't mean to be hyper critical, the work you are doing is exquisite, hate to see that kind of workmanship like that suffer in the long run. 

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Do you think it's possible to plane off those pieces without ruining what you have done so far?

No, I would not try and plane it away. There are expansion grooves at the bottom and top. I am thinking that I might also add a groove through the centre - it will never be seen and it just reduces the surface area some more. What do you think?

Regards from Perth

Derek

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21 minutes ago, derekcohen said:

No, I would not try and plane it away. There are expansion grooves at the bottom and top. I am thinking that I might also add a groove through the centre - it will never be seen and it just reduces the surface area some more. What do you think?

Regards from Perth

Derek

I like that idea, didn't even think of it. Could even do 2 grooves if need be, not sure how long the end pieces are. Do you think the vertical grooves will affect smooth drawer movement? If they do I'm sure you can come up with a solution for that as you move forward, and as you said the grooves will be completely hidden.

By separating the internal piece you've likely solved the main problem of the cross grain glue up! Great idea!

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The other item to factor in is that the case is 20mm thick and the internal side panel is only 6mm thick. Not only is it insulated, and has two expansions grooves, but it is 40mm narrower than the case side. I doubt it can have much impact. To be safe, I with add a 6mm groove through the centre.

Regards from Perth

Derek

 

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3 minutes ago, derekcohen said:

The other item to factor in is that the case is 20mm thick and the internal side panel is only 6mm thick. Not only is it insulated, and has two expansions grooves, but it is 40mm narrower than the case side. I doubt it can have much impact. To be safe, I with add a 6mm groove through the centre.

Regards from Perth

Derek

 

Yes, I thought about that also, the thinner internal piece will likely lessen the problem. 

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Your design, and execution has always been impressive.  With that said, I see your thought processes, and execution improving with experience, and at the same time, bringing all ours up along with yours due to learning from the great photo progressions, and explanations!

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