Chestnut

The Nut House V2

Recommended Posts

Finished making the very low end vise for my workbench last night. It works, it's not nice, but it works. I need to hit it with a coat of shellac for some minor protection and then install cork on the jaws for some added grip.

Morris Chair 005 Share.jpg

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Would also suggest a taper at the top back of the outside piece.  Will be helpful when hand cutting and you need to tip the saw.

Looking good!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 minutes ago, TIODS said:

Would also suggest a taper at the top back of the outside piece.  Will be helpful when hand cutting and you need to tip the saw.

Looking good!

Good idea never thought about that.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 minute ago, I B said:

Nice! I made one of those too, changed my life.  Are the front parts of your clamps attached to the board or is it just floating? The clamps I got had holes so I screwed them into the front board. Just wondering. 

https://i.imgur.com/NtjQGIF.jpg 

 

Congrats on the PJ aircraft carrier. 

Free float. I was debating drilling holes to add screws. Did you ever run yours unsecured? The one nice thing about free float is it's easier to adjust the vise in and out but how many times and i going to move it more than 1/2"?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
17 minutes ago, I B said:

That's a good point. When I have to move it out, it's a 2 step kind of dance. Move this side out, move that side out, move this side out etc... The whole thing take less than 10 seconds but yeah... It's rare. 

My other though is to secure 1 side but not the other to get the benefit of both or have holes if i need to put a screw in or take it out for what ever reason. For the few times you need to move it a long way it'd probably be faster to zip the screws out and then back in.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

very nice shop, congrats. do you have a water heater/ furnace in the basement ? not sure if  thats a concern or not, dust in the air. I tend to worry about stuff, sorry.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
14 minutes ago, blackoak said:

very nice shop, congrats. do you have a water heater/ furnace in the basement ? not sure if  thats a concern or not, dust in the air. I tend to worry about stuff, sorry.

Yep and no worries. I do my best to keep the dust away from that area and have a HEPA cyclone. I figure if some airborne dust gets in there it's just extra fuel burned and out the exhaust, maybe it'd make my gas bill cheaper :D. My water heater has a sealed combustion chamber and as soon as this furnace craps out that one will go the same route.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Depends on how old the water heater is. They have the combustion chamber sealed up so much these days they come with a spark igniter cause you can't get in there with a match.  But we never had an issue with the water heater that stood 6 ft from the tablesaw when I was growing up. We might blow the dust off the top of it when we cleaned up.....

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Just now, wdwerker said:

Depends on how old the water heater is. They have the combustion chamber sealed up so much these days they come with a spark igniter cause you can't get in there with a match.  But we never had an issue with the water heater that stood 6 ft from the tablesaw when I was growing up. We might blow the dust off the top of it when we cleaned up.....

The one i have is the new sealed up versions you light the pilot with an ignitor, i just wish it went to electronic ignition honestly a pilot light costs as much to run as a 100 watt light bulb. More stuff to fail but with the hard water around here water heaters don't last long as it is.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Water heaters used to last 15 - 20 years around here but the €%£#?¥$ make them to fail faster these days. 

They do make electronic ignition water heaters, the tankless ones !

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm still hesitant on the tankless ones. I"m not sure how well they'd combat the cold water temperatures we see in the winter. I don't know what they do to make them not last but it stinks. In my Bismarck house the water heater was a year older than i was and was still working great.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The last 2 hot water tanks I had both started leaking within about a year of the 6 year warranty expiring. 2 plumbers have told me that the tanks with a longer warranty are the same as the ones with a shorter warranty. They just charge a little extra for the longer warranty.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
23 hours ago, Chestnut said:

I'm still hesitant on the tankless ones. I"m not sure how well they'd combat the cold water temperatures we see in the winter. I don't know what they do to make them not last but it stinks. In my Bismarck house the water heater was a year older than i was and was still working great.

Do you ever replace the anode rods?

I was told you're supposed to replace those once every 5 years or so.   I've never done it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Never replaced an anode rod in 40 + years. But we have great water in our area. Never have problems with minerals or corrosion. I guess it varies by region, water source etc.  Anode is a sacrificial part

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I guess i never knew water heaters had annode rods. Interesting. Those rods are huge. Nuts get installed on water mains and they are just like 2" but last 50+ years. Probably don't have to replace it just knock the scale of hit it with some sand paper and stick er back in.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
28 minutes ago, wdwerker said:

Never replaced an anode rod in 40 + years. But we have great water in our area. Never have problems with minerals or corrosion. I guess it varies by region, water source etc.  Anode is a sacrificial part

Yeah, tartar (calcium) is the enemy for those rods, you also see it accumulating in your stainless steel teapot over time. It's a big issue with well-water, but less common if one is hooked to a public water system.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 minutes ago, Immortan D said:

Yeah, tartar (calcium) is the enemy for those rods, you also see it accumulating in your stainless steel teapot over time. It's a big issue with well-water, but less common if one is hooked to a public water system.

They don't soften here like what i was used to in ND. I have one of those fancy ion exchange water softeners though and they do help a lot. Filters for water that goes in coffee pots or teapots helps those over time as well.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Chestnut said:

I guess i never knew water heaters had annode rods. Interesting. Those rods are huge. Nuts get installed on water mains and they are just like 2" but last 50+ years. Probably don't have to replace it just knock the scale of hit it with some sand paper and stick er back in.

I didn't realize it either.   Here's this thing you are supposed to do standard maintenance on, and nobody says a thing about it.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Another tank item that has bitten me a time or two. You are supposed to manually operate the blow off valve each month. Anyone do that? Me either. After having a couple fail, I now pipe them to a drain, and try to pull them twice a year. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

After fighting a pop off valve with a tiny leak I routed a copper pipe to a hub drain.  I operate it maybe once every few months.  I've also got a drain pan under the water heater and I flush any debris from the bottom of the tank every year or so.. I still hook a garden hose to it but the pan catches the enevitable drips.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Oh man i always thought those valves were 1 time use only.

I thought this was a woodworking forum how did we get talking about water heaters? :P

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

No, no, no, and no! My comment was not meant to be off topic! When my valve burst, remember....this is a hot water tank...the steam and splatter would have ruined any nearby project. As it was, it quickly turned my house into a sauna. This was easy to correct quickly, but could have spelled ruin for many projects. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I was joking. You bring up great points and things i will consider. The water and steam would also rust cast iron tops in short order. I do like that the water heater and stuff is in an unfinished part of the house.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


  • Who's Online   3 Members, 0 Anonymous, 181 Guests (See full list)

  • Forum Statistics

    28627
    Total Topics
    386237
    Total Posts
  • Member Statistics

    21627
    Total Members
    1529
    Most Online
    DIYMike
    Newest Member
    DIYMike
    Joined