Robert Morse

I'm building a shop!

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Yep I'll follow along. I'm excited to see what you make of your space, and hope everything goes smoothly.

Did you have some strict stormwater considerations you had to make?

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1 minute ago, Chestnut said:

Did you have some strict stormwater considerations you had to make?

No - the inspector from the county was surprisingly pretty laid back - didn't require silt fencing for construction, and said as long as the splash blocks were in place, we should be good.  We are working hard to not add any more impervious surface than necessary to the lot.  I was concerned they were going to require a drywell, or something else, but so far, so good.  Its hard to see in the photos, but there's a 4' drop to the left of the berm of dirt - drainage is decent in that area of the lot. 

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2 hours ago, Robert Morse said:

No - the inspector from the county was surprisingly pretty laid back - didn't require silt fencing for construction, and said as long as the splash blocks were in place, we should be good.  We are working hard to not add any more impervious surface than necessary to the lot.  I was concerned they were going to require a drywell, or something else, but so far, so good.  Its hard to see in the photos, but there's a 4' drop to the left of the berm of dirt - drainage is decent in that area of the lot. 

Nice, i thought practices in your area were quite strict but it appears that due to the small development you have very reasonable requirements. I am a municipal engineer and the differences in regions interests me a lot. I'm for some of the more strict regulations, ecosystems can be fragile and trees grow in ecosystems and i like woodworking so it all comes full circle.

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4 minutes ago, Chestnut said:

Nice, i thought practices in your area were quite strict but it appears that due to the small development you have very reasonable requirements. I am a municipal engineer and the differences in regions interests me a lot. I'm for some of the more strict regulations, ecosystems can be fragile and trees grow in ecosystems and i like woodworking so it all comes full circle.

We're pretty lucky to be just outside city limits - the area we're in still has many multi-acre lots, and quite a few folks with pocket farms/barns/outbuildings (although not necessarily on our street).  The county seems to be far more willing to work with homeowners while protecting the ecology of the area, rather than the more adversarial nature we saw and heard about from other folks in town and dealing with city code compliance.  

I share your concerns about making sure the ecosystem is sustained as much as possible - we love our trees and the deer, bears, bats and birds that come with them. 

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Ah, a shop of one's own. Beautiful, Robert!

My FIL has his standalone shop right at the intersection of Woodinville-Duvall Road. If you're interested in a shop tour, LMK!

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Awesome!  My brother built (well, the building never stops, really) a house and shop in Tenakee.  I built a pole building at my last house in McCall, Idaho.

I like that you didn't rob wall space (I've done the same) but you might invite discussion about natural/raking light.  I like your high windows.  My pole building had a gravel floor, which had advantages, but eventually I would have paved it.  I had no water supply or drain - I really like having that handy in my current shop.  I think a drain might be easy to install.

This will be fun to follow.

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9 hours ago, Pondhockey said:

I like that you didn't rob wall space (I've done the same) but you might invite discussion about natural/raking light.  I like your high windows.  

We live in western Washington... between the clouds, the rain, and the short days, there's NO natural light for half the year anyway. :)  Kidding aside, the windows face east, so I'll get some early morning light, but the nature of our lot precluded windows on the west side, and as for the north facing windows, well see my comment about no light outside for 6 months of the year. I'm planning for a LOT of LED shop lights, and when the weather is nice for that one week in mid-August each year, I can open the garage door. 

You had mentioned the floor: we'll have a slab poured as soon as the building is complete. 

 

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1 hour ago, Robert Morse said:

no light outside for 6 months of the year.

Yep know what that's like, won't start getting daylight here for another 3 months. :(

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Monday morning update: Things are happening. 

We woke up to rain this morning, so much rain.  At 7am, right on time, the build crew showed up and started driving stakes and laying out lines for the building perimeter.  Today they'll dig, and put concrete in the bottom of the holes.  They'll also schedule the inspection for the holes. Speaking with the foreman, he mentioned he has some scheduled time off over the next couple of weeks, but he still thought they'd be done with the building in 2 weeks or so. I'm at work now, and REALLY wishing I was home to watch the process.  I'll try to get some more pictures tonight if I can make it home before dark. 

The kids are excited, because they'll get another pile of dirt to play in.  My boy keeps telling us his favorite thing about our old home was the pile of dirt in our backyard he could dig in. Merry Christmas kids, Santa is coming a week early for you!

I spent Sunday morning using a rented excavator to move that maple I mentioned earlier... The excavator was fun and frustrating at the same time because the logs kept slipping out of the jaws. I have a sawyer coming over on Wednesday to slab it out for me.  I'll post about that in Wood forum later. 

 

staked and stringed.jpg

excavator.jpg

hauling logs.jpg

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19 minutes ago, Robert Morse said:

They'll also schedule the inspection for the holes

Yep that's a hole. :D I love those inspections.

19 minutes ago, Robert Morse said:

I'm at work now, and REALLY wishing I was home to watch the process.

Thinking web cam and share the address so we can all watch. Someone that used to frequent here did that for us and it was incredibly entertaining.

19 minutes ago, Robert Morse said:

logs kept slipping out of the jaws

Next time you kind want to curl the bucket so your not pinching it to carry it but holding the log with the bucket. I've also seen operators use the blade in the front of the machine to carry stuff with out the jaw. I'm a professional construction watcher, couldn't carry a log with an excavator to save my life.

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26 minutes ago, Chestnut said:

I'm a professional construction watcher,

Arm chair construction worker,  "NO hard hat required in this area".

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23 minutes ago, Chet said:

Arm chair construction worker,  "NO hard hat required in this area".

Nope still have to have the hard hat, it's squeaky clean and sits on the back seat, but it's there for the clipboard warriors.

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They would have to know what an LVL is , have enough people or equipment to move them plus a truck or trailer big enough. Hopefully they are safe for a few days. But it is sad that we have to worry about such things.

Are you going to have insulation and a sloped ceiling ? Painting a high ceiling white will really improve the light in your shop. Think about this when the right ladders or scaffolding are in place.

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4 minutes ago, wdwerker said:

Are you going to have insulation and a sloped ceiling ? Painting a high ceiling white will really improve the light in your shop. Think about this when the right ladders or scaffolding are in place.

Yes to both.  I'm doing that once the building is done. The money for extra labor is gone... in fact, according to my wife, ALL the money is gone  :) . I have a friend who is going to loan me a rolling scaffold, so that plus a panel lift will help considerably.  

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