Eric.

Hand Tool Cabinet

Recommended Posts

Since you granted...I thought the screw clocking would drive your OCD turbo to fly to pieces. 

OCD and insanity are two different things.  I used almost a hundred brass screws on this cabinet.  It wouldn't take that long to clock them all, but I didn't even consider it as a rational human thing to do.  So I didn't.  Not that I'm rational.  But thanks for noticing! :D

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I wondered the same, why did you put the hinges on the outside?

Is it hung with a French cleat?

Also, Eric, how did you make the doors?

I'm just noticing too, the sliding dovetails. That took some precision to do those while using box joints for the frame!

Edited by K COOPER

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

As for the "why piano hinges," if that's what anyone is asking...I used them because of the considerable weight the doors are carrying.  They're not the best looking things in the world, and ordinarily I wouldn't use such visible hardware (especially on "real" furniture), but if the doors sagged that would be a big problem.  The doors DID sag, in fact, when I tried the thinner brass hinges from Lee Valley, and that's why I went on the search for thicker brass hinges, ultimately failed, and went with stainless steel instead.  Not ideal but it is, after all, just a tool cabinet.  I made it as attractive as I could but in reality it doesn't matter at all since it's just shop furniture.  It did bother me initially that I couldn't find exactly what I wanted, but I'm way over it now.

To the question "why mounted on the outside?"  Two reasons...one is exactly as Carus said...they don't show when the doors are open, and the doors will be open most of the time.  So actually they are less visible mounted on the outside.  Second reason...I'm lazy and it's way easier that way.  I would have had to mortise them into the case sides and doors otherwise, and that would have been "work."  Also the leaves of the hinges are wider than the thickness of the sides and doors...so that would have been another problem.

Coop, yes the cabinet is hung on a French cleat.  I was able to secure the wall cleat to three studs with six 3" screws, so it's anchored very well.  The cabinet cleat was glued and screwed hard core to the back of the cabinet.  I have no concerns about its strength.

The doors are just simple boxes.  Box joints for the sides and grooves for the plywood.

The case is constructed with Dominoes, and the sliding dovetails for the internal shelving on the left side have nothing to do with the case.  I built the plane till and the shelving compartment after the case was done and just slid them in.  The sliding dovetails look trickier than they are...it's all about layout.  Took a little concentration, but it wasn't difficult.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I like the grain match on the interior drawers. That's a nice touch. Some may say it's not necessary...which makes it even better.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Love the doweled sliding doves on your drawers. Haven't seen that before - very elegant. The brackets for your main dust collection pipe....looks like,you designed them to slide the whole contraption out about a foot? Your design?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Nah Vinny, it doesn't move.  You're seeing the bottom of the upright supports for the lumber rack, and the pipe straps are screwed into them.  Your imagination is playing tricks on you. :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That is so cool..I like his work bench allot to..I can see this also takes care full planing and what crafsmenship....I would however be more than happy with what you have done..Thank you for sharing that Eric..I been enjoying seeing all the great work on the forum..Nice job again.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Nah Vinny, it doesn't move.  You're seeing the bottom of the upright supports for the lumber rack, and the pipe straps are screwed into them.  Your imagination is playing tricks on you. :)

LSD

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Strap on your seatbelt and let me introduce you to Mr. H.O. Studley, the man who built the tool cabinet that tells all other tool cabinets to get their dollie and go home to play with the rest of the children.

 

Maybe this is where I have to turn in my official woodworking card...I certainly appreciate the workmanship of the Studley tool cabinet but aesthetically...not a fan. 

It's just so much in such a small space I find it overwhelming and to access half the tools you have to remove other tools to get to them.

Okay, with that bit of heresy out of the way, Eric...love your cabinet. Wonderful work.

I'm finishing mine up, hopefully this weekend. Wish I saw your small drawers before I did mine though. I love those doweled joints and they would have gone perfectly with the doweled shelves I put in.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks man!  Post pics of yours when you finish!

Maybe this is where I have to turn in my official woodworking card...I certainly appreciate the workmanship of the Studley tool cabinet but aesthetically...not a fan. 

It's just so much in such a small space I find it overwhelming and to access half the tools you have to remove other tools to get to them.

Aesthetically I find the Studley cabinet to be a simply beautiful, elegant piece.  But functionally, I totally agree with you.  It does seem like it would be quite fiddly to access some of the tools.  It's an amazing feat of design and engineering, but it does seem to pose some inconveniences.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks man!  Post pics of yours when you finish!

Aesthetically I find the Studley cabinet to be a simply beautiful, elegant piece.  But functionally, I totally agree with you.  It does seem like it would be quite fiddly to access some of the tools.  It's an amazing feat of design and engineering, but it does seem to pose some inconveniences.

Yeah, it's beautiful but not functional. What's the point of having 4 marking gauges when you have to reset them in order to fit them in the cabinet? 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ya'll are likely speaking out of context. Imagine moving between jobs like Tom King. The stuff all fit in a case that fits on your jackass's rump as you walk down the road. You get to the next site, set your bench, pull out what you need and go to town. He likely did not load that chest every night. 

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'll also throw my hat in the ring, the studley cabinet is cool, to look at. It also appears to be a nightmare to work out of. And C, I get your point, BUT, once the 5 tools he used for xyz operation are done, and he needs 3 more, it's back to playing Tetris, for how many dozens of operations a day?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Agreed, the Studley is awesome from a 10 pounds of crap in a 5 pound tool cabinet, but if I had to use it to get out tools I'd either never take em out, or never put them away, or I'd hit myself in the head with a mallet every time I did the above. Sent from my 831C using Tapatalk

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I bought the DVD about the chest, just to see it being emptied out. No way in hell would it be functional  in a hobby shop, let alone a working shop. Awesome, yes, very much so. That's about all it has going for it. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.