Chestnut

Shop Storage Shed

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On 6/10/2018 at 7:21 AM, Tom King said:

I built access into the attic over an addition on our house with a hinged gable end vent.  I didn't want to leave any ceiling opening inside, but maybe you could hinge the window to be used as a door. 

Around here, a "shed" is built on the side of another building, with one or more open sides, or freestanding with open sides.   Anything else is called a "building".  For instance, my Tractor Shed is open on two ends, with a dirt floor.  It's built on the side of a shop building, and has a trailer shed on the opposite side of the shop.  Both of those sheds have Shed Roofs.

That's an interesting idea i might look into that. I just loaded some lumber into the attic to work on the rood last night and it was really easy to throw it up the spacious access i cut into the attic floor. I cut the access around 32" x 32" so i can almost fish a full sheet of ply up there. I never will because I'll store ply in my garage where it's far easier to get to it. Carrying that much weight up the hill to the shed got old for the sheeting.

Worked on the sheeting for the roof. Got it mostly done except for a small 12" x 4' piece. The pictures show a bigger hole than i left.

The sheet in this picture went over the large gap in the following pictures.photo4974427987357313066.thumb.jpg.6ef5dda89bdaca553c5d4dca157f4349.jpg

photo4974450845173262290.thumb.jpg.e9a8711c8aa6725608909040140ff1a3.jpg

photo4974427987357313065.thumb.jpg.2ca8436d4e41aa2c8ccd5e5b9925362d.jpg

So glad i got the roof sheeting on. I can relax a little bit because every time it rains now the whole structure doesn't get soaked. I was worried for a while that stuff was going to start rotting on me. I still might buy some of that pre-treat paint and hit the bottom of the studs and the area around the sill plate for extra protection from decay. I was also slightly worried about using 2x4s for the rafters despite my calculations telling me it is ok. The thing is sturdy.

Other issues. I dropped the end rafter and broke the end off from the birds mouth down. Also i found out that my rafter cutting skills is terrible and the ends stagger worse than a drunk college student at 2 am on Saturday.

photo4974450845173262289.thumb.jpg.db4181f28134cd3dd8144a976e0dcfc5.jpg

Right now i'm working on making the frames for the overhang.

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Shed is looking great.   Im thinking you will cut off the rest of the broken birds mouth and scab another one on from the side of the rafter away from the gable.    Have had some things keeping me away and I wondered how your truck is coming along also.

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8 hours ago, pkinneb said:

Shed looks great but I gotta know what Subaru do you have? That's one quick lumber hauler :) 

'13 WRX hatchback. Had it since it had 6 miles on the odometer. It's usually just my highway vehicle.

7 hours ago, mat60 said:

Shed is looking great.   Im thinking you will cut off the rest of the broken birds mouth and scab another one on from the side of the rafter away from the gable.    Have had some things keeping me away and I wondered how your truck is coming along also.

Pickup died, there is a crack somewhere in the engine. So i ordered a 2019 GMC Canyon.

That's basically how i fixed it. I realized that it was on the end and the frame things i was making for the overhang would fix the problem.

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1 hour ago, Chestnut said:

'13 WRX hatchback. Had it since it had 6 miles on the odometer. It's usually just my highway vehicle.

Nice!

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The shed is progressing well and the view from the attic is nice... in case you get in trouble in the main house and have to spend time there. :D

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You're getting there!

The first few years when I was building new houses to sell, I used scaffolding I made from 2x4's, and 2x6's, before I started accumulating scaffolding.  OSHA would frown on that now, but if I was building something on my own property now, and didn't own a lot of scaffolding, I'd still do it the same way.  They used to sell double headed nails for just that purpose, to make it easy to pull the nails back out,  but that was a long time before battery powered impact drivers.

One thing that I have always done, since I did everything myself, was to completely finish one side of the house at the time while the scaffolding was set up, including installing gutters, and any painting.  It looked kind of strange for a while, as one side would be completely finished while the others would just be covered with plywood, but I believe it really did save time over all.

I never built anything using roof trusses, and always cut the ends of rafter tails in place.  I don't have anything specifically against roof trusses, but I have always worked with just one or two helpers, and some rafters were 2x12x24's.   Cutting the tails in place really doesn't take any more time, since you're up there on the scaffolding anyway for the next steps, and they can be easily made into a perfectly straight line .  I even have a certain way I hold the circular saw using my ring finger to pull the trigger, and a saw with a blade brake, for cutting rafter tails.   Pulling lines comes into play multiple times when building a house, if you care.

Pam's WRX hatchback is an '04 with 242,00 miles on it.  Never been in the motor, or drivetrain, but when it starts showing signs it's getting tired, we'll get another one of the current model.   I changed the timing belt at 140,000, just because I was worried about it, but the one that came out still looked like the new one going in.

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@Tom King Yeah the new WRXs are a WORLD apart form the 04s. Not saying that there is anything wrong with the 04s, in fact i love that year. They have advanced the parts technology for their engines and done a lot of drive line changes. It doesn't really change the car a lot but it gives it far more of a polished edge, changing it from an economy car to more of a sports car.

I'm impressed but not really surprised by the miles. I'm sure you take good care of it and it's unmodified. It should last a LONG time.

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That’s a great looking building. I’m not an expert but when securing aluminum I’ve used aluminum nails. You don’t want to use dissimilar metals that could react with each other. The aluminum soffit on my house is not attached to anything, it is just held in place by the aluminum facia and an aluminum channel on the house, it can’t move as they interlock together. 

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My aluminum facia is attached with nails colored the same as the facia. The soffit is held in place by J-moldings nailed to the side of the house & the back of the facia board

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Aluminum nails must be hit straight on, any angle leads to many many bent nails. If I remember right it's much easier when nailing through a hole into softwood. Plywood is harder & it bounces so watch your fingers holding that nail.

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50 minutes ago, drzaius said:

My aluminum facia is attached with nails colored the same as the facia. The soffit is held in place by J-moldings nailed to the side of the house & the back of the facia board

This is how I did my shop. That's one nice looking shed! I had a roll up door on my shed at a previous house I think I like the double door better although I'm not sold on the glass.

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24 minutes ago, pkinneb said:

This is how I did my shop. That's one nice looking shed! I had a roll up door on my shed at a previous house I think I like the double door better although I'm not sold on the glass.

I didn't really want to have the glass but it was clearance so i didn't get a choice. It nice though for light. I don't have power there and don't know if i will soon.

Thanks I'll do alum nails. I saw a YouTube video where a guy did screws but i don't know they make thosein aluminum.

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2 minutes ago, Chestnut said:

I didn't really want to have the glass but it was clearance so i didn't get a choice. It nice though for light...

For sure I didn't have power in mine so you're light was a bit of an issue. It also depends on your use of the shed mine was primarily for storing lawn and garden stuff and always seemed to be a mess so when I saw your glass doors I thought of all the times I knocked something over in the shed. Mine was also right in the line of fire for the kids games looks like yours is far enough back to save it from a kickball or football LOL.

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51 minutes ago, Chestnut said:

I didn't really want to have the glass

Done the road if you want, you could remove the glass and replace it with a raised panel similar to th lower section.

Nice work so far Drew.

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They make solar light kits for sheds . Price and quality seems to vary greatly. Could be handy if you need to get a board one night. Of course if you can get to the shed without a flashlight........

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50 minutes ago, Chet said:

Done the road if you want, you could remove the glass and replace it with a raised panel similar to th lower section.

Nice work so far Drew.

Is probably just put blinds that attach top and bottom. I like the look on the outside with the glass.

29 minutes ago, wdwerker said:

They make solar light kits for sheds . Price and quality seems to vary greatly. Could be handy if you need to get a board one night. Of course if you can get to the shed without a flashlight........

I looked at those as the trouble i came across was running direct bury power is cheaper And the shed doesn't really get any sun to generate much power.

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There are battery powered LED fixtures that you can screw to the wall & either use a switch or built in motion sensor. I've got a couple of the motion sensor ones in closets & the batteries last a couple of years. Much easier than fishing in power (says the electrician B)).

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Aluminum trim is nailed on with color matched painted stainless steel trim nails here. I carry roofing nails to dimple the aluminum and create a through hole and then am careful to not over drive the trim nails. 

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Always used aluminum  trim nails and don't face nail anymore than you need to.   Most of the time a nail every 2 1/2 FT is plenty. As guys said just drive nails in so it is just touching the trim and that's it.  Also be carful not to buckle the trim and sometimes that means leaving the trim down a bit... Shed is looking good but just think of all the furniture material you used up.

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