Chestnut

Shop Storage Shed

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Way better built shed than most anything you can buy.  Man your siding will never come off.  ;)  Don't no what you have in it but I built a small garden shed for my wife and the cost adds up quick.  Nice work.

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1 hour ago, mat60 said:

Way better built shed than most anything you can buy.  Man your siding will never come off.  ;)  Don't no what you have in it but I built a small garden shed for my wife and the cost adds up quick.  Nice work.

$3,300 The siding and higher end roofing bumped the price up a bit. I don't know if you'd call this a small garden shed it is 200 sq ft. I could have done it for $2,700 if i wanted it to look more like a shed. I wanted it to look like a house though. I will put gutters and down spots on it yet so there is another $100 there and I'll run electrical too at another $100 so $3,500 total. I get too much erosion from water dripping off the edge.

Paint is going on this weekend. I want to get it painted before i install the soffits and fascia. Just make it one less thing i have to be careful next to.

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That looks darn good. I like the color of the blue.  Do you have someone that has a break you can use for the fascia?  Not sure if you said and I may have missed it.

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Looks great!    I've never used preprimed stuff, so I hope I didn't mislead you into buying too much paint.   I've never covered anything with one coat of any paint.

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On 7/30/2018 at 1:40 PM, mat60 said:

That looks darn good. I like the color of the blue.  Do you have someone that has a break you can use for the fascia?  Not sure if you said and I may have missed it.

I've got brakes on my car? Other wise i just have the prefab stuff from the box store. It's got some matching rustic texture to go with the textured siding. For making bends i was going to use a hammer and the edge of a board.

You do bring up an interesting point about bending the fascia. It would allow what ever size is needed to be made. I never thought about it i always assumed people just always bought the premade stuff. I'm not sure how the premade stuff is going to work. It's 6" and i'm going to put it over a 1x6, which is 5.5". With the soffit underneath and the 1x6 being slightly under the roof line everything should work out well. At least this is how i planed it.

On 7/30/2018 at 2:00 PM, Tom King said:

Looks great!    I've never used preprimed stuff, so I hope I didn't mislead you into buying too much paint.   I've never covered anything with one coat of any paint.

Nope i have half a gallon left. which is about 50% more than what their little thing quoted so i'm glad I listened.

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This looks great man. I've been thinking of picking up a 10x10 shed to hold lumber in, I am using my basement as overflow and once I move the oak I have dried down there I will basically be out of room. Unless I do a serious reorg on it and stack to the ceiling. Actually that's a pretty good idea...

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Oh S*#t! I can see this being a MIL house. Be careful and stand your grounds. Well done bud. 

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So i never did get around to doing the soffits and fascia last fall. Megan told me i had to finish the shed before i started on anything else. Last night i hung some F channel and rain disrupted me. I needed to cut a bunch of soffit material so i grabbed a few lengths and brought them into my shop.

I rigged up a makeshift MFT style table. I clamped down a pice of 1/2" ply and put a hook stop on it.

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I used a smaller piece of 1/2"ply to suport the track on the leading edge. I used the track saw clamps to keep things in place. I measured over the length i needed the material and squared the track to the furthest piece of ply.

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Then it's as simple as feeding the soffit underneath and making the cut. I switched the blade backwards in the saw. I also wanted to try turning the speed down and cutting with the blade forward but i'm not sure if that would work.

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I got enough cut for the once size. Luckily the size was all the same. I have to measure the rest of the overhangs and see how much i need to adjust the setup. I hope they are all consistent in size all the way around. it took me far longer to set everything up than to make the cuts.

I'm going to remember this in the future if i ever need to make repeatable wide cuts. This was pretty easy and quick to use. Also will probably have less tear out than table saw cuts.

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7 hours ago, Chestnut said:

I switched the blade backwards in the saw. 

Huh?!

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33 minutes ago, Mark J said:

Huh?!

Works better for cutting thin aluminum. The right way just tends to tear up the metal unless you go super slow & are super careful.

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11 hours ago, wtnhighlander said:

Backwards works for steel sheeting, too. But use a cheap HSS blade, save your carbide for wood.

I'm not so sure anyone makes an HSS blade for the TS55.

I'll probably send this blade out for sharpening when i'm done.

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There used to be a blade sold especially for cutting plexiglass.  It may still be, but haven't had a reason to look.  It looked exactly like a hollow ground, non-carbide tipped finishing blade, but the teeth were backwards, or at least the writing showing the direction of rotation indicated that way.

For cutting sheet metal, there are some really good carbide tipped blades made for that purpose.  On steel roofing, I use an Irwin blade made for that purpose, with a cheap circular saw, and plywood guide.  You need a full face shield though, as it sprays hot bits of metal as it goes through the metal like butter.

I doubt that blade with know that it had done anything by the time you finish cutting vinyl with it.

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When i use vinyl for soffit, if the length of the rafters are not longer than the length of a piece of soffit, I'll run it down lengthwise, and then continue normally along the sides.  It comes out looking a little less obvious for being vinyl.  I used it on this dormer because I didn't want to get up there, and paint it the first time, much less when I'm older, and it needs it again.  You need to install nailer blocks to fasten the long piece with stainless fasteners through some of the little vent holes.

edited to add:  The proportions of that dormer look a little better when it's viewed from in front of the house, rather than like this looking up with a wide angle.

IMG_1572.thumb.JPG.4f0dbb2d01aa024f71140500343c39cd.JPG

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That is an interesting idea Tom I'm going to have to look into that when i get to the ends. I think i forgot to mention that the soffit material I'm using is aluminum.

For nailing the aluminum in place is it difficult to drive nails through the aluminum with out pre-drilling?

16 hours ago, Mark J said:

Huh?!

I don't know why it cuts better but that's what everyone said to do. I really want to flip it the right way and see if the foam support underneath and the spplitter guard on top are enough for a smooth cut. Though as the saying goes "If it's not broken don't fix it"

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I've never used aluminum.  I just use the little ventilation holes in the vinyl.  I wouldn't worry so much about a nail, or screw going through the aluminum, but it might dimple it.  Any nailers need to have spacer block that make up for the thickness of the soffit parts that would otherwise be unsupported, and any fastener might pull those parts in too far.

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1 hour ago, Chestnut said:

That is an interesting idea Tom I'm going to have to look into that when i get to the ends. I think i forgot to mention that the soffit material I'm using is aluminum.

For nailing the aluminum in place is it difficult to drive nails through the aluminum with out pre-drilling?

Go buy one of these:

https://www.menards.com/main/building-materials/siding/siding-tools/malco-trim-nail-punch/1460009/p-1444438824223-c-13071.htm?tid=-7954264049280437957&ipos=1

It'll let you nail without marring the surface... and you can set the nail into the little grooves of the soffit.

I did pre drill sometimes, when I didn't have a good angle for the hammer as you need to give it a hard first whack to punch thru.   Don't need much, just a small pilot hole for the nail to slip into.   Only because nail heads aren't real pointy.   Could probably accomplish the same with a sharp awl.

 

 

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22 hours ago, Chestnut said:

That is an interesting idea Tom I'm going to have to look into that when i get to the ends. I think i forgot to mention that the soffit material I'm using is aluminum.

For nailing the aluminum in place is it difficult to drive nails through the aluminum with out pre-drilling?

I don't know why it cuts better but that's what everyone said to do. I really want to flip it the right way and see if the foam support underneath and the spplitter guard on top are enough for a smooth cut. Though as the saying goes "If it's not broken don't fix it"

This was my trade. Ask any questions I don’t answer. Staples will drive through the blind portion that lays against the framing. Run the soffit in a way that leaves access to that blind fin. Any place the fascia (assuming aluminum) does not lay nicely against the framing, you might pre-drill. We nailed every other soffit joint through the bottom lip of the fascia. That puts your nails every two feet and in each piece of soffit as you drive the nail through both male and female portions of the joint. Any place the lip is not up, the face will pucker if not done properly. For a one house experience level, drilling might be wise. For  face nails, I go minimal. One high in the center that just about hides under the edging, and one that supports any overlaps or transitions. Jus be sure to not nail through two layers at the lap. I start a roofing nail first. The blunt roofing nail will make a through hole that dimples and makes a nice place for your trim nails to hide. Only draw, don’t drive to try and pull. The metal will warp if you do. 

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I have never seen aluminum trim down here.  I just checked Home Depot online, and our store says it's unavailable in store, and unavailable to ship to that store.   I know vinyl moves a lot, and can crack if it gets too cold, so it might get too cold for vinyl up there?  It would be interesting to see where the market switches from one, to the other.

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