Chestnut

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The other option is to buy, order what you want, have it delivered and set in place.  I wouldn't use a big box store shed company.  Remember your time has a value.  

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Just now, Woodenskye said:

The other option is to buy, order what you want, have it delivered and set in place.  I wouldn't use a big box store shed company.  Remember your time has a value.  

 I am looking to add a storage shed sometime soon and plan to go this route. I will prepare all the foundation but have them come in and build in place.

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42 minutes ago, MattF said:

 I am looking to add a storage shed sometime soon and plan to go this route. I will prepare all the foundation but have them come in and build in place.

I looked and having them build in place, which was slightly more expensive due to labor on site, but I would rather go either of these routes then building myself over several weekends. 

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@Chestnut What does your house look like? My highest priority would be to match the style, roofline, overhangs, etc to the main house as best I could (unless you plan on changing that stuff in the near future).  Whenever I see people build secondary structures that don't match, it doesn't matter how nice it is if it differs too much from their house. Just my 2 cents.  Add a couple pics of your house if you can!

Dormers add complexity. They look amazeballs, as @Alan G showed us, though.  If it were me, I'd be hard pressed to justify it, unless I were retired .....someday (sigh).

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10 hours ago, K Cooper said:

Nut, do you really, really, really intend on sitting out on this porch? I would maximize my allowable 200 sq. Ft. as a storage shed. You can never make these suckers large enough. I built a 12’ x 16’ shed a few years back and for attic storage , I decked 5’ on each end which gave me a 6’ opening in the center for access. Does your 200’ limit include the porch overhang? 

Overhang isn't included in building square footage according to my surveyor. And decks are not considered part of the structure and generally fall under their own code. The shed is going to be on the highest part of my lot looking over my neighborhood, the view from where i'm putting it is the whole reason i'm considering it. I may not sit up there a ton this summer or next summer but maybe when i slow down a bit.

9 hours ago, Woodenskye said:

The other option is to buy, order what you want, have it delivered and set in place.  I wouldn't use a big box store shed company.  Remember your time has a value.  

Yeah the whole point of going overboard is so I get to build it. I'm excited for this, like everyone else gets excited for roubo builds. Also my dad who is retired is going to come and help me. On the heavy equipment part i have a sprinkler system i don't really want to damage and getting the shed to the back of a 0.6 ac lot would leave some might big ruts in my soft yard.

8 hours ago, JosephThomas said:

@Chestnut What does your house look like? My highest priority would be to match the style, roofline, overhangs, etc to the main house as best I could (unless you plan on changing that stuff in the near future).  Whenever I see people build secondary structures that don't match, it doesn't matter how nice it is if it differs too much from their house. Just my 2 cents.  Add a couple pics of your house if you can!

Dormers add complexity. They look amazeballs, as @Alan G showed us, though.  If it were me, I'd be hard pressed to justify it, unless I were retired .....someday (sigh).

The dormers are the only thing that would make it look a bit different from my house. Other wise the house siding is going to be the same and the roof pitch on the house is 6/12 and i'm going to do 8/12 so not too far off. I have a little porch area on the front of my house as well. I'm in the middle of a Morris chair build i don't mean to be rude but this shed dormers and all are going to be a break from complexity.

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18 hours ago, Chestnut said:

It's going a direction i like. This is quite rough but gets the idea across.

Not sure what you mean steve. Beings that i'm going to be doing all the excavating with a shovel and my own two hands i don't really want to dig a root cellar. As awesome as it would be.

 

Shed v3.jpg

I like that with the porch.   

I don't really have a porch on mine, just a ramp coming down from the door and then a little deck out front to run the push lawnmower in and out.

And I gotta do something about that this spring, I had backfilled around the ramp and deck with gravel, but this past year the buggerly rabbits learned how to excavate and are now living under my shed.

 

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11 hours ago, Woodenskye said:

I looked and having them build in place, which was slightly more expensive due to labor on site, but I would rather go either of these routes then building myself over several weekends. 

I looked into Tuff Shed, which is a big chain that preframes the shed in their warehouse and then brings it out as a flat pack and stands it up on site.   They're not too bad, pretty well made.   Price wise a simple 10x12 shed starts in the $3-4k range.   

 

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53 minutes ago, Minnesota Steve said:

I looked into Tuff Shed, which is a big chain that preframes the shed in their warehouse and then brings it out as a flat pack and stands it up on site.   They're not too bad, pretty well made.   Price wise a simple 10x12 shed starts in the $3-4k range.   

 

My rough price was around $2,400 for a pretty big complex shed. I don't even want to know what it would cost for someone else to build what i want. To those saying my time is worth something, it's not really. Paying someone to build this so i could do something else would make that something else so prohibitively expensive that i wouldn't do it.

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21 hours ago, Chestnut said:

Shed v3.jpg

I'm liking this one. Except for the dude on the porch with his hands in his pants lingering by the window. He's creepy.

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12 hours ago, Chestnut said:

shed dormers and all are going to be a break from complexity.

:lol: Ha! I didn't mean it would be too complex for you to build it...but the details are complex in that they create more opportunities for roof leaks in the future, and the framing is more complex, regardless of whether you do timber framing or stick framing.  You probably knew all that, I was just trying to remind you to not underestimate this little junk, it will add a lot of time to do it correctly.  Be sure you want it badly enough to offset the extra effort, that's all I meant.

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On 2/22/2018 at 3:36 PM, Alan G said:

I attached a pic of the shed I built at the back of our yard. It is 12x14 with 8' walls. Main roof pitch is 8/12 and shed roof is 3/12. I went with the shed dormer off the side to let in more light and also give more interior space. Also was trying to mimic the look of our house.

I built this all myself from digging the foundation to laying the surrounding stone so feel free to ask any questions you have. Happy to share my experiences.

As far as your design goes.....

Are 10' walls a must? On a structure this small the 10' walls are a bit out of proportion with the length of the walls.  It just looks a bit strange. 8' walls will give plenty of interior space.

No matter what I would run your roof longer on each side (R&L) to create some overhang. The double gable on the front looks a bit odd. If you must do 10' walls you could lessen the front overhang of the main gable and then run a shed roof in place of the smaller gable. That would give you the porch space you wanted and break up the front wall. Would also possibly allow for a window at the top of the main gable.

SHED COMPLETE.JPG

Believe you could start a tiny home business if you wanted to.

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I've been meaning to build a shed at my house as well for all my yard stuff and other crap that's in the way.  I'll probably end up going with a kit or something from home depot for like $1,000, just want a basic one and nothing fancy, don't have a ton of time to put into it.

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14 minutes ago, bushwacked said:

is it done yet? :)

It snowed 12" Saturday night and that has to melt yet along with all the other snow that we got earlier this winter. So it might be a while.

Some one was curious where it will be located. So i circled the spot it's going to be in the backyard picture i took the other day.

5a959a0e0144f_IceFishing055-Panoshed.thumb.jpg.25a6d283182325cfc01ef8f33c18dabd.jpg

Zoomed in.

5a959a9b3bed8_IceFishing055-Panoshed2.thumb.jpg.a0228f08b35bd724f5381a9c87901fd0.jpg

There is a spot between the 2 hemlock trees. I think they are hemlock either that or fir.

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I bought my shed from some amish folks. It's an 8x8 for $1500. It came fully built and it was pretty awesome to watch them bring it into my backyard. After looking it over it's incredibly obvious I could have done that myself. I may not be the best woodworker ever, but the sloppiness that hurts me with woodworking would be no problemo for construction. :P

 

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Well we keep getting more and more snow but it has to stop some time. I'm almost finished with the Morris Chairs. I'm wrapping up the cleats and frames for the upholstery and then next week it's finding someone to tackle that for me. Wood was on sale so i loaded up. This is trip 1 of what i assume will be 3 total. I had to share a picture because of how absurd this looks and also the Menards yard employee was laughing his but off when i pulled away from the yard.

4129629048228423236.thumb.jpg.db03ce7420ece560657b0ad3add223fe.jpg

I had it loaded up with  26 2x6x12'  8 2x4x12' and  50 2x4x10'.

Now for a serious question. I was thinking about doing rail road ties for the base. Is this a good idea or bad idea?

The other option is ground contact green treated. No I'm not doing concrete or block.

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Id go treated but I bet the cost is more.  As far as the truck I bet it was a little light in the steering department..:)

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X2 on treated. Not to snow on your parade but have you seen the the long term forecast :o

...unfortunately might be a while before we will have outdoor working weather

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2 minutes ago, mat60 said:

Id go treated but I bet the cost is more.  As far as the truck I bet it was a little light in the steering department..:)

It was indeed, i also had my trailer behind hauling some new patio furniture but that didn't make it in the picture. I really should do a napkin calculation of how much weight that was. It's either the most I've had it loaded or dang close.

Ok i did the math 1742 lbs with pine at 44 lb per cu ft. Yep that takes the cake for most loaded in the back the 2nd place was 1600lbs of lath and plaster. 3rd place was 20 sheets of 4x10 sheetrock.

Who needs a fullsize pickup! I've owned it for 14 years and every day it surprises me still.

7 minutes ago, pkinneb said:

X2 on treated. Not to snow on your parade but have you seen the the long term forecast :o

...unfortunately might be a while before we will have outdoor working weather

You shut your mouth! :P I'm hoping that the 50s this week will take care of some of the snow. If i can get bare ground i'm going to start work DGAF if i get muddy. I'm going to run out of time busy season at work is getting close.

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Unless you can get brand new railroad ties and bed them in plenty of gravel 

I would go with ground contact treated.  Being in the great frozen north I hope you sink posts below the frost line. Plenty of sheds down here are built on 6 x 6 skids and delivered on a tilting flat bed truck. 

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7 minutes ago, wdwerker said:

Unless you can get brand new railroad ties and bed them in plenty of gravel 

I would go with ground contact treated.  Being in the great frozen north I hope you sink posts below the frost line. Plenty of sheds down here are built on 6 x 6 skids and delivered on a tilting flat bed truck. 

I was going to turn in a couple anchors just so if the city ever asks i can tell them that it meets their shed code. I don't know that I've seen many shed around here that have foundations below the frost line. The 3 that my dad has built just float on the ground.

I think 3 votes for treated in a short time is pretty overwhelming. I looked at the RR ties today and they look awfully crappy. It's all of $50 difference so it's not worth it failing because of trying to save $50.

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The used railroad ties in the south end up pretty degraded . Guess what they are replacing them with ? Treated railroad ties ! New railroad ties might just last forever under a shed, but you need equipment or a small army to move new ties.

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