RichardA

A New finished project, in More ways than one

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Very nice work Rick, I’m sure they appreciate the great work you did, and maybe it will generate more orders for you 

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2 minutes ago, Tom King said:

I've been a pallbearer more times than I even remember, and I don't remember a single one of the caskets, because they didn't really matter.  I would always remember this one, because it does matter.

If you know the person or people, it always matters.  Thanks Tom.

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Well done bud and hard fought. I’m sure building these two reminded you of the one you built for your love? The heart is a neat added touch. Having worked with it, how do you like cedar :unsure:

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1 hour ago, Tom King said:

I've been a pallbearer more times than I even remember, and I don't remember a single one of the caskets, because they didn't really matter.  I would always remember this one, because it does matter.

@Tom King, go back a year or so and look at the one he built for his wife. Helluva an undertaking. 

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Nice work, Rick. And a great service to offer folks. I kind of like the way cedar sapwood streaks run through.

Would you mind sharing any build details, hardware and such? I'm curious about the handrail attachments and lid closure, specifically.

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38 minutes ago, wtnhighlander said:

Nice work, Rick. And a great service to offer folks. I kind of like the way cedar sapwood streaks run through.

Would you mind sharing any build details, hardware and such? I'm curious about the handrail attachments and lid closure, specifically.

There's really not to much hardware, just the 5" bolts that attach the handrails to the case. I run them through a base that keeps the rails 2" away from the case. They are stainless, so there's a decent look to them.  The lid is a slide on, from the pic's you can see a guide attached to the lid that fits tightly along the side of the lid. To make the lid slide easier, I simply added Johnson wax.  There are 10 counter sunk holes in the lid top to anchor the lid after the consumer is inside.  3 Along each side, and 2 on each end. One other point, is when I made the sides and ends, I ran a dado 2" up from the bottom of each side to accept a 3/4" piece of plywood, then turned the case over and added a 2" by 1" strip along the inside of the bottom for added support for the bottom.    Here in Tennessee, the law is, that anyone can make a casket. However it can be rejected by the funeral home for it being unsafe during transport. They can reject it if they feel the ends or bottom will fail and the consumer falls out.  So, I go out of my way to over engineer each one so that doesn't happen. 

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9 hours ago, RichardA said:

If you know the person or people, it always matters.  Thanks Tom.

I was talking about the caskets.  I always knew the person, but the bought caskets never seemed to mean anything, at least, not to me.

8 hours ago, K Cooper said:

@Tom King, go back a year or so and look at the one he built for his wife. Helluva an undertaking. 

Yes, I remember that one very well!

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7 hours ago, Mark J said:

Rick, that's a great job.  And what a fantastic idea you've come up with.  

Having seen the Caskets in a funeral home, I realized why they are so expensive. It's an assembly line production, so there are a bunch of bored employees adding a piece here and a piece there, and there's no emotional involvement.  I'm involved and therein lies the difference.  And I can make them less expensive. Especially with a  Grade A wood supplier like Spanky available to me.  

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You know, since you seem to be looking at this as a potential business, have you considered offering cremation urns?  A lot of woodturners make them, but it certainly doesn't have to be round.  Maybe it's a regional thing, but there seems to be some demand, and not just for people, but pets.  

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1 hour ago, Mark J said:

You know, since you seem to be looking at this as a potential business, have you considered offering cremation urns?  A lot of woodturners make them, but it certainly doesn't have to be round.  Maybe it's a regional thing, but there seems to be some demand, and not just for people, but pets.  

+1 A nice lidded box would probably be popular. 

The casket looks very nice, and I can imagine that it is very meaningful to the customer to be involved in the process and have more input on the design than picking one out from the “standard” options. 

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29 minutes ago, Mark J said:

@RichardA, you might find this guy's web page interesting:

https://vanduynwoodwork.com/urns-for-sale/

He posted on the AAW site.  Among other things he makes cremation urns.

Interesting site. But if you remember when you were here, there was no room for a Lathe, so turned urns are out.  However boxes can be used as well.  I have a Cherry and Curly Maple one I now use for cigars that's going to used for my resting place.  But thank's.

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No, I was thinking about boxes.  He has some information about sizes I thought would be helpful.

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9 hours ago, RichardA said:

 However it can be rejected by the funeral home for it being unsafe during transport. They can reject it if they feel the ends or bottom will fail and the consumer falls out. 

Seriously? I've seen what the homes use for temp transport from the morgue.

Particleboard and staples.

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I’d imagine they only get rejected if they are made from cardboard and duct tape. 

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2 hours ago, wtnhighlander said:

Seriously? I've seen what the homes use for temp transport from the morgue.

Particleboard and staples.

From the morgue to the funeral home is not considered a casket, it's merely transport.  I've seen them use an ambulance type gurney for that transport.  Caskets are in the public eye so they have to be somewhat safer from failure.

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Beautiful work and finish. I was a pallbearer in a funeral that had a wood casket. Weighed a ton. The funeral staff put me at the back end. The haul was uphill and all the weight shifted to us on the end.

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