Ronn W

Kym's Table

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I could see myself building something like this and when finished thinking how the heck am I getting this to its final destination.  

I like the leg design!

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I will have to attach the top to the rest on site.  No way I could get the whole thing out of my basement in one piece.  The top will be a bear all by itself.

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After spending a weekend with you, I know this will be done right. I like your plan. Thanks for taking us all along.

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9 hours ago, Ronn W said:

Table will be 44" x 96'.  No leaves ( A monster ).

We had a dining table made that has a solid top 118" x 43" and 1.25" thick, with 3" x 1" apron rails. That is a heavy monster. It was delivered by a delivery company rather than the company who made it and they just dumped it on our driveway. Even without the legs attached getting it inside was, shall we say, interesting. I remember it involved the use of 2 trolley jacks and copious mounts of questionable language. It wasn't just the weight, it was difficult to manhandle and navigate through multiple doorways.

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Started gluing up the pieces that will be multiple lams.  The easy ones first,  The top supports (3" x 2").

I had a little movement (bending) of the pieces after milling the individual lams.  Decided to clamp it down to the workbench as well as clamp the lams together. Workbench is pretty flat.

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Here's the other set.  remove clamps, scrape glue, run through jointer to square the piece, then to the paner for final thicknessing.  I stopped just short of final thickeness and will take the last pass this evening when the other piece is ready.  The jointer and planer work were done within about 90 miuntes of glueing so the glue is not totally rock hard.  Hoping that will be easier on the blades.P1010009.thumb.JPG.ea967054210e31768c68d7c2c028c0ec.JPG

Thiniking ahead:  I  plan to let the pins in the breadboards secure the end of the table so won't need 8Foot long clamps but for the other direction I need to get some clamps.   Any deals on 48" clamps that you are aware of?   Maybe I will just by some pipe since I won't be using 48" clamps that often.

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Now the base peices.  In this pic the pattern piece is ont he bottom. Used guide blocks at both ends to prevent tearout.  First Piece.

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Cut bases to length a little too soon. befroe I added 2 more lams to each base for a thickness of 3".  Set aside until it is time to mark bases and legs for mortises. 

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Added 2 more lams to bases and routed using first 2 lams as pattern. After cutting moretises for legs will add 1 more inch to each side for total thickness of 5"

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On to the legs. In order to be able to layout mortises I will have to maintain straight edges to measure from. Each board will yeild 2 legs. First joint one edge and then rip just enough off of opposite side to have parallel edges. Then make first cut between the 2 legs.  Look closely to see pencil lines for legs,

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Now to make sure that each elg has parallel sides.Red pencils  show sides already parallel. Brown pencils show sides line that need to be cut parallel5933837beb0d0_P1010007(2).thumb.JPG.c833cfa31a3bf71745fa3c6ec318de12.JPG

Cuts down on table saw.

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Band saw work done. About 1/16" outside the lines.

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Align legs and mark enter line and width of area that must remian straight.  No router between the lines.  First piece to be router already has tape applied.P1010010.thumb.JPG.b3741872b916a0628ed865faaaa1fed6.JPG

Love the bit with 2 bearings.  This one can cut 1 1/2" which it exactly the thickness I have.

 

 

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Made 6" long cross pieces out of scrap from the legs.  Test clamped them together and measured the width from leg to leg.  All 4 masurements were within 1/32".  I can live iwth that.  Legs are not yet cut to final length.  Working everything of the centerline.

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The legs are not yet final thickness.  Must add one more 3/4" lam to each side of each leg so they are a total of 3" thick.  But Since the Domino 500 can only cut so far from the face of a board, I first need to cut the mortises for the cross piece.

Am now in the porcess of setting up and practicing iwth my new Domino jointer.  Pretty slick.  One problem........Folowing the instrcution manual, I cannot get the centering scale to center on the width of the domino.  I have moved the scale all the way to one side and even trimmed the edges of plastic a little.  Each try is a little better. I started out 1 1/2' line widths off.  I am now limited by the body of the screw against the sides of the holes in the plastic scale and am still 1/2 line width (about 1/4 mm) off.  Will call Festool on Monday.  Frustrating.  I admit that is most cases I will not be using the tightest fit, but still.

 

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@Ronn W, That is interesting and indeed frustrating about the Domino. My only other suggestion is to work through the Domino DF500 Supplemental Manual, I found it enormously helpful in getting started with the domino in different applications. I can't attach the PDF, but if you google it or PM me your email address I'll send it your way. Goodluck!

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Thats some nice work Ronn.  The legs are looking great.  Looks like the first go around with the domino went well

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Nice work. It's all coming together. Are they the 10x50 dominos? I've been wondering how big you can go before they become too small for the job. I suppose the weight/load is different on your legs to a "traditional" table with aprons and legs.

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I just got caught up with this one, Ronn and its awesome !! Very nice work and cool design

 

 

Sent from my SM-N910W8 using Tapatalk

 

 

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You do clean work, Ronn.  I always appreciate seeing a meticulous nature.

Just curious...is there a reason you didn't just buy 8/4 to save yourself all that gluing?

PS...the Domino is a "joiner," not a "jointer."  Sorry, terminology police on duty.

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6 hours ago, Eric. said:

You do clean work, Ronn.  I always appreciate seeing a meticulous nature.

Just curious...is there a reason you didn't just buy 8/4 to save yourself all that gluing?

Partially because of BF price for thicker stick and also because the Domino "Joiner" will only reach about 1" below the surface so for the mortises in the 3" legs to align with the mortises in the 5" base, I have to build the base to 3", then mortise , then add thickness. Also  I cannot pattern route anything that is thicker than  1 1/2", so work 3/4" at a time made sense to me.

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