Chestnut

Morris Chair Pair

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Looking forward to this, 'nut! Morris chairs are the ultimate man-cave furniture. I have never sat in a recliner as comfy as a Morris chair.

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My man cave is where my tools are and I'm not sure that I'll be keeping the chairs down there :D

Got the legs glued for the chairs and the legs for the stools cut out. I went with 8/4 for the stool legs because i could make them 2" out of 1 piece instead of having to deal with a glue line. That little guy in front is going to be my test leg. it's not full length but I'll use it for mortise practice. I'll do the same for tenon practice.

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After that milling i figured it was time to check the DC and sure enoguh the container was half full, so i emptied it. I also checked the filter and it has a fair ammount of seasoning on it. I don't think it's abnormal but I'm sure glad it's in the filter and not in my lungs :D

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Moved on to cutting out the main rail parts for the chairs. Working on 2 chairs side by side labeling is going to be crucial so I'm writing novels on the parts to keep things strait.

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PARTS!

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I've been using my bandsaw for ripping and i love how it's working out. I feel like i'm able to utilize more material because i have less kerf loss though i'm probably jointing and planing away just as much in the end.

Figured out that I read one of the dimensions wrong on the plans. I'm realizing now that working from someone else's plans is not the easiest. How they dimension things isn't how I'd do it and it got me a bit confused. Luckily i cut every leg part but 1 drastically oversized and still have enough length. I had to scrap 1 piece so not a big deal. If Marc ever sees this helpful feed back on guild projects would be consistent dimension on plan sheets. Label the overall dimensions on 1 side of the sheet and label the location of mortises and tenons on the other side of the sheet and always adhere to the same side for each. Always have overall on left and details dims on right for example. Though this is a good thing for everyone to do even with their own designs.

 

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I started this chair build last week too but you're already ahead of me.  I need to get my new bandsaw before I get too far anyway though...

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58 minutes ago, bleedinblue said:

I started this chair build last week too but you're already ahead of me.  I need to get my new bandsaw before I get too far anyway though...

Are you making 1 or 2? I started the mortises and tenons last night. I just need to finalize layout and trim the rail stock then go to town crating a lot of tenons.

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1 hour ago, Chestnut said:

Are you making 1 or 2? I started the mortises and tenons last night. I just need to finalize layout and trim the rail stock then go to town crating a lot of tenons.

Just one.  After making two kitchen helpers a few months back, I'm not likely to do a double again any time soon...especially on a project of this magnitude. 

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4 minutes ago, bleedinblue said:

Just one.  After making two kitchen helpers a few months back, I'm not likely to do a double again any time soon...especially on a project of this magnitude. 

Oh i like the doubling up i can probably make 2 as fast as i could make 1. I'm writing a novel on the board though as to where it's located and what chair it's on.

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Mortise technique. I did Marc's technique where you plunge the ends and then go back and forth to remove the middle lowering each time with the turret stops and it works great Then i tried a method that Mattias uses with his pantorouter where you make a series of plunges and then basically clean up the tiny bits left between plunges and that worked great too. Is one more right than the other?

Marc's

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Mattias's

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So 1 mistake = 1x2:huh:. Make no mistake about it. Looking good nut. Good luck bud, watching this all the way. 

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I've had better luck plunging the ends then removing the middle. The multi-plunge method always seems to result in the bit skipping across the mortise when you try to clean it out causing a slightly wavy effect.

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11 hours ago, wtnhighlander said:

Drew, the spiral bit I use for plunging such mortices seems to work better with the Matthias method. 

YMMV

It was a bit faster yes but the walls had indents on them.

10 hours ago, Mick S said:

I've had better luck plunging the ends then removing the middle. The multi-plunge method always seems to result in the bit skipping across the mortise when you try to clean it out causing a slightly wavy effect.

Yes i noticed that on a few as well. Mine looked like where the bit plunged it vibrated or deflected and left an indent. I think I'll be using epoxy on the assembly so it's not a huge issue. Also with how big these tenons are i don't think it's an issue but on something smaller i'd probably use the other method.  I did 50/50 so if a chair falls apart I'll make sure to see why.

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Maybe the results I got with the plunge method were because I was using a bit of smaller diameter than the mortise width, and a template to define the mortise. No wavy walls, though.

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Probably just a mental thing but I seem to get a better result with Marc's method.  I also added a second edge guide, one on each side of the work and that really stabilizes everything a lot more and eliminates any possible side to side movement.

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1 hour ago, Chet said:

Probably just a mental thing but I seem to get a better result with Marc's method.  I also added a second edge guide, one on each side of the work and that really stabilizes everything a lot more and eliminates any possible side to side movement.

I never thought about 2 edge guides that's a good idea. I can only install 1 though. :(

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1 hour ago, Chestnut said:

I never thought about 2 edge guides that's a good idea. I can only install 1 though. :(

What router are you using?

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Just now, Alan G said:

What router are you using?

Porter cable 890

The edge guide is super nice solid with precise adjustment. Also despite it not being green the DC was top notch i didn't wear my respirator and never smelled a thing (it was hooked up to my ct26 though)

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I just looked up your edge guide. It's the single trapezoidal bar style ?  If you got a piece of 1/4 or 3/8 plexi and drilled it to use as a base (just use the original as a template) it would be easy to adjust the edge guide to locate the bit correctly then just add a fence strip on the opposite side with a couple of small C clamps. 

I've  made router bases for years using the old one as a template. Clamp the piece to the old base, drill through one screw hole, poke a screw in as a pin & drill the next one. I've used a forstner bit for the center hole. Drill plastic at slow speeds.  I usually buy longer screws.

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6 minutes ago, wdwerker said:

I just looked up your edge guide. It's the single trapezoidal bar style ?  If you got a piece of 1/4 or 3/8 plexi and drilled it to use as a base (just use the original as a template) it would be easy to adjust the edge guide to locate the bit correctly then just add a fence strip on the opposite side with a couple of small C clamps. 

I've  made router bases for years using the old one as a template. Clamp the piece to the old base, drill through one screw hole, poke a screw in as a pin & drill the next one. I've used a forstner bit for the center hole. Drill plastic at slow speeds.  I usually buy longer screws.

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It's this one. The plexi is a good idea I'll have to keep that in mind. I just finished all the mortises on the legs but my next project will have as many mortises as this one. Next project is a couch in the same bow arm style.

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