What's on the bench.


Chestnut

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It'd be kind of fun to do the half laps in a stair step around the frame so no on edge extends full length.

I really like the look of splined miters and figured out a good trick so they are pretty easy now. Gluing is the only sucky part, I only have 1 picture frame clamp.

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I’ve had good luck with the tape method for mitered picture frames, but it is a bit fiddly. Tried a band clamp a few times but hated it. 

On 1/5/2023 at 8:15 AM, Chestnut said:

It'd be kind of fun to do the half laps in a stair step around the frame so no on edge extends full length.

I really like the look of splined miters and figured out a good trick so they are pretty easy now. Gluing is the only sucky part, I only have 1 picture frame clamp.

I’ve wanted to do this half lap method too. I’m sure you’ll get around to it long before I do.

L-Fence is fantastic for trimming the splines, if you haven’t used that method before. 

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2 hours ago, JohnG said:

L-Fence is fantastic for trimming the splines, if you haven’t used that method before. 

I indeed use an L-fence method. It's not an L-Fence per which ever woodworking magazine has presented. I just have a 1"x1" hardwood block with holes in it that I attach to my fence above the table of the table saw. It does the same thing but it's easier to joint a board and drill 2 holes than make the complicated fence contraption. This is tongue in cheek because the L fence isn't complicated. I just didn't have the time to make it but had the 1x1 already jointed and milled and just had to drill 2 holes for my fence clamps.

This is a picture of what I'm doing, ignore the operation I'm doing here but it is the only picture i could find. I have a different piece of milled hardwood instead of this piece of plywood. Also instead of being on the table it just gets clamped with a space underneath.

0906211531-01.thumb.jpeg.67758f3219f9a0091f889cb66f96077e.jpeg

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Thinking about that vacuum bagging setup, I was checking on release fabric for doing fiberglass work in it.  Rudders are no longer available for our Hobie 21, and I was thinking about pulling a mold off of one of the rudders we still have on it.  It wouldn't be too hard to make some really strong ones with carbon fiber layup, but about the only good way to do it is with vacuum bagging.

Found a bunch of choices right off:

https://www.westsystem.com/tools-supplies/vacuum-bagging-supplies/release-fabric/

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  • 2 weeks later...

I have too many dice.... I'd need about 50 of these boxes. I played a LOT of MTG and got a lot of dice from taking part in events. Often if you place in the top 5 you get some sort of prize.

That's a cool idea though for the standard set of D&D dice. My mind first went to the way more complicated version of making a hollow hexagon with a top and bottom and then cutting an insert to fit using the insert to hold the lid on. Kind of like a lined box. Hitting the hexagon miters might be harder though.

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The backside of my tablesaw blade was out about .005". First time I've had to align the table on this saw, and man it's nice using well-designed tools. Took longer to make a new miter-slide for the dial indicator (couldn't find whatever I'd cobbled together during assembly) than to true up the saw, though I did have to grab a breaker bar for a couple of the factory bolts. Marc was right about the SawStop set screw adjustments.

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After advice from you guys, and some of my own ideas...I got started on my rolling workbench. It will be a cabinet style, with a 32"X6' top. Laminated 1"X2" red oak. All the lumber is cut to rough length for the cabinet...and I just finished the top(along with first coat of BLO).

How many coats of BLO would be appropriate for this top?

20230205_171821.jpg

20230205_171844.jpg

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How much is "enough" depends on your goal for the finish. If you just want to seal the work surface against glue drips and such, 2 or 3 is probably good. But on a surface that sees a lot of contact, BLO wears away. The rule of thumb is to apply one a day fir a week, once a week for a month, once a month fir a year, and once a year thereafter. 

That is a good rule for tool handles, probably overkill for a benchtop.

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I only sanded to 120. It was slick for 3 days, and on the 4th day I rubbed in some sawdust, then cleaned it off. A week later, the shine is gone, and it is a nice working surface. Not slick, but not grabby, either. Been using it to build the cabinet on, and all is well. The cabinet is built, and dry fit. Dado's and rabbets turned out nice.

I have to mill the lumber for the back now, and glue it up. It'll be a solid oak back...about 52"X 31"X3/4". I'll set it into a 3/4" deep rabbet all the way around the inside of the back of the cabinet. Unless someone has a better idea. It's one of them things I've lost sleep over...lol

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