Nickhxc4life

Need jointer, planer, and bandsaw have $900

Recommended Posts

Hey everyone, 

So I think I’ve advanced my skills far enough that I want to start working with rough sawn lumber to keep my costs down. I have $900 and would like to pick up a jointer, planer, and bandsaw. Please provide recommendations. I mostly build things for my house or friends and family and given my price range I’m not looking for anything top of the line. I’d prefer new as equipment from Craigslist etc. isn’t always reliable or requires an overhaul. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Don't intend this to be mean, but you need to reevaluate your budget especially since you don't want used.  You need to determine size and then research what is available and what limitations you are willing to deal with.  $900 could be used up with just 1 tool on your list.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yeah, that's the reality.

If you want to look at new equipment prices just to get your expectations adjusted, Grizzly is decent to good quality at a value price and has an entire line from soup to nuts.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Unless you can adjust the budget, you aren't going to find more than one of the tools that you might acquire new.

I understand your reluctance to go with used gear, but you really can get a lit more bang for the buck that way.

If you still want new, I'd suggest buying the Dewalt 735 planer ($500+) and a nice jig saw. The planer can joint faces with the use of a sled, and the jig saw will do most of what a small bandsaw can do. Then save for the next purchase.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You can get a jointer plane, a jack plane, and smoothing plane for around $900 from Lie Nielsen or Lee Valley. :) 

For power tools, you'll need to pick one to start with. A new DeWalt 735 planer with the extra infeed/outfeed tables would be around $600 and allow you to plane rough lumber up to 13" wide. You could put off the immediate need for a jointer by using a sled with the planer, or a scrub plane / jack plane, to remove high spots from the rough lumber and get it flat enough for planing.

The DeWalt 735 is well-regarded for a portable planer. It's also what I have. Because my jointer is only a 6" model, I have to use the planer sled method for any rough lumber wider than 6". Eventually, I would like to get a wider jointer, or a Hammer jointer / planer combo machine and have a jointing capacity the same as the planing capacity.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well I figured everyone was going to tell me it can’t be done but perhaps I should just stick to my own research as no one has any decent input. Given my budget I’m looking at brands like craftsman and rigid. I’m not looking for expensive tools and I have no problem making jigs to help the tools work more accurately if needed. Disappointed that whenever someone has a post like this that everyone spends all their time saying what can’t be done instead of what CAN be done. So please don’t post of all you’re going to do is tell me my budget is too low. My budget is what it is 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The Ridgid 6" jointer is decent, and new, is $550 I believe.  Grizzly has a line of bench top jointers that will be cheaper, but will offer awful performance. 

You can get a Dewalt 734 planer, refurbished, for $300-350.  Perhaps WEN has a slightly cheaper version on Amazon. 

As far as bandsaws, I don't know of any 14" models for under Grizzly's base model, something like $550.  I paid something like $400 for a Craftsman BAS350 a few years ago, if those are still on the market it was worth the price. 

You can say everyone is being hateful or unhelpful all you want, it doesn't make it so. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Brands like Craftsman an Rigid are doable but the tools you get in a price range you are looking are going to set you up for a certain amount of frustration in the accuracy that can be achieved.  Constantly having to fiddle with the set up of a tool can turn an enjoyable hobby into something less the relaxing.  Most everybody here has started in the hobby a tool at a time.  I started with nothing more then a radial arm saw and a router.  Replaced the radial arm saw with a contractor saw and added a bench top router table.  A year latter I added a bench top planer and a small 6 inch jointer.  Over the years all of this has been replaced with some pretty nice hobbyist gear. 

What you want to do is decide what it is, at this point, that you want to build and get a couple of tools to help get started.  Rough lumber can save you money but if your tools aren't up to the task, you can waste wood with having to redo parts because of poor performing tools.   Also see if you can find a hardwood dealer in your area that sells S3S lumber, (surfaced 3 sides)  this can be a good way to start and is kind of between rough and the stuff you find at the big box.

I would start with a table saw because you need to cut wood and you need to spend a little money here because wonky doesn't work and can be un-safe.  Stay away from the small bench top or portable models.  If you need the band saw to cut curves, start with a nice quality jig saw.  If you want the bandsaw to re-saw lumber then you are going to have to re-think things because this takes a lot more band saw then your budget allows.  You can get buy with a lesser quality planer but then you need to allow for snip so plan before you cut to final length. 

But in reality when you use lower grade tools it can take all the money you save buying rough cut lumber and throw it in the scrap pile.  All in all it is a very rewarding hobby but it isn't a cheap hobby. 

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I just did a quick search and a Ridgid Jointer is $599, the planer was $369, add in sales tax and you are at $1000 without the bandsaw. The reasons for a lot of answers you get, are because a lot of the experience people have here.  Buying used is a solid option, but CL isn't always the answer, so posting a WTB ad here or other forums you might make your budget, otherwise find work a rounds like others have mentioned.  

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I agree Gee Dub some good advice here I would definitely be looking for used Delta, Jet, Grizzly tools in that price range you can get two of the three for sure, and IMHO opinion the quality will be better not becuase there is anything wrong with Rigid (I started out with a rigid TS) or Craftsman although my hoity toity self would limit Craftsman to wrenches :o. Its just that for that price range to get full size tools you will have to go used and I would argue that's not opinion its a fact.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

As others have said, $900 is a pretty tight budget for buying the tools you want new, but I think it also depends, to some degree, on what you're building.  If you're building smaller things and not working with large pieces of stock, you have more wiggle room.

Some possibilities:

  • I have a DeWalt 734 planer (mentioned in an earlier reply) - $400 new.  I think it does a good job.  It's 12 inches wide and has only one speed (vs. 13" and two speeds for the 735).  I use it as little as possible, because it's kind of noisy, kind of messy, and I'd rather be making something than planing rough stock.
  • I have a Delta bench-top jointer - $349 new.  I use it almost exclusively for edge jointing, and rarely working with stock longer than 4 feet.  For my purposes, it does a good job.  If I were working a lot with longer stock or if I were face-jointing stock, I would probably want something better (the place I buy wood will face-joint for $0.09/bf, so I'm not going to be doing that job).  I've also read some positive reviews on Cutech jointers that are around that same price point - but no first-hand experience.
  • The bandsaw could be a challenge, if you want to use it for resawing.  I have a Rikon 10-306 that I just got about a month ago - $340 new (with a 15% off coupon).  I use it for cutting curved pieces, and I'm happy with it for that job.  I did resaw a couple of small pieces when I needed some stuff 3/8" thick, and it did okay, but I wouldn't want to do a lot of that (and I think it's limited to a 4-1/2" cut).

On the bright side, the holiday season is upon us, and there should be some sales going soon.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, Nickhxc4life said:

Well I figured everyone was going to tell me it can’t be done but perhaps I should just stick to my own research as no one has any decent input. Given my budget I’m looking at brands like craftsman and rigid. I’m not looking for expensive tools and I have no problem making jigs to help the tools work more accurately if needed. Disappointed that whenever someone has a post like this that everyone spends all their time saying what can’t be done instead of what CAN be done. So please don’t post of all you’re going to do is tell me my budget is too low. My budget is what it is 

 

If I had $900 to spend... I'd get a Grizzly 555 bandsaw and a Ridgid or Dewalt planer. Save for the jointer down the road. Buy S4S lumber for now. 

There are too many compromises to get all three in that budget.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 hours ago, Nickhxc4life said:

Well I figured everyone was going to tell me it can’t be done but perhaps I should just stick to my own research as no one has any decent input. 

YO?

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 hours ago, Nickhxc4life said:

Well I figured everyone was going to tell me it can’t be done but perhaps I should just stick to my own research as no one has any decent input.

I’d be interested to hear what your research is telling you.  I understand that budget constraints can be difficult but I’m not sure that you can find much better advice than what you are getting from these very seasoned woodworkers. Working with low quality tools will often make this hobby quite miserable and in the long run, I think the strategies mentioned above, buying tools periodically when budget allows turn out to be the best.  I started out with a circular saw and jigsaw and over the past 5 years have added the router, table saw, planer, and finally the jointer in the past month.  Yes, I did a lot of work with lumber from the big box store to begin with, but it allowed me to build my skills and save for the tools that I really wanted.  Just my two cents for the discussion.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

wow. for $900 you have harbor freight , ryobi , wen , some grizzly , bench top/portable options . i was surprised with the "no decent input" .I treasure the advice I have received , on many subjects . with that budget , not alot of great choices . the answers hard to hear can sometimes be the most help . 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

By no decent advice I meant that I didn’t ask people to reply with a lengthy post about how my budget is too low or how tools in that price range aren’t worth. I’d rather those people not post at all....not that complicated to understand. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You can get all three tools from Amazon within your price range.  WEN makes a bench top 6" jointer, 12" planer, and a free standing 10" bandsaw.  All just under $300 each. 

*the WEN jointer is over $300, but there's a porter cable next to it for cheaper.*

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
44 minutes ago, Nickhxc4life said:

And what is wrong with bench top options? This is a hobby. I don’t make things to sell at this point. I make things for fun. 

If you're making pens, probably not much.  If you're trying to do bigger projects, prepare yourself for frustration. 

 

Here's a comment from another thread from @ChestnutIf i've learned anything. You'll more likely regret the $500 you didn't spend over the thousands you do spend

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Nickhxc4life said:

By no decent advice I meant that I didn’t ask people to reply with a lengthy post about how my budget is too low or how tools in that price range aren’t worth. I’d rather those people not post at all....not that complicated to understand. 

This is confusing to me.  People are taking the time to give you sound advise and you dismiss.  I did 30 seconds of research on brands you mentioned in an earlier post and provided real numbers that indicate your budget is light at the moment.  Your budget is your budget, but when advise is given on how to work around the constraints again it is dismissed.  Tell us what you want to hear and then we will all understand.  When I first started here, I didn't want to hear the truth from people, but guess what they were right in the end. 

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I jointed for two years by hand. I sawed for one month by hand. I plane often today by hand. This sways my advice. This is just like a car dealership trying to sell you a car rather than fix your old one. Don’t shoot the messengers. They mean no disrepect. Most on this list of replies have benefitted from establishing those priorities and then getting to building. With $900, I would build straight line rip for a circ saw, unless by rough lumber you mean logs. Then maybe the band saw gets priority. Then I’d buy the best planer $900 will buy. I’d keep my eye out for a used handplane to joint wide boards. There are some good to poor workarounds for planing boards on edge. I have never tried it.  

That’s my advice built on my experience. That is all I can offer. I can not invent experience with Wen or other. 

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.