What did you do today?


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That's interesting.  The charging rate does decrease as the percent of charge increases.  

I don't recall getting similar instructions with the i3, in fact I'm not sure that there is a way to program it to stop the charge at 90%.  

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My DIL has a sister (lives on the other side of the country) who is an extremely unfit parent, so they have taken on legal guardianship of he 7 YO son. So now I am his defacto grandfather. His other g

Just spent a very enjoyable few hours with @Ronn W when he stopped by on his way to Marc Adams woodworking school in Indiana. A great bowl of chili and some homemade sourdough bread with cupcakes for

Speaking of projects to make the wife happy, I finished up the crown molding on our first floor yesterday. Had a bit of a break since I started since we had our deck built in the middle. Old deck

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1 hour ago, JohnG said:

They recommend 85-90% for daily driving when you don’t truly need the full range. I’ve heard a few reasons for this from different sources-

1. Charging the last bit takes longer and is less energy efficient to charge, since it has to slow down the charging rate. 
2. Regenerative braking does not work when the battery is full, reducing driving efficiency. 
3. Long term life of the battery. The batteries do lose some capacity over the long term, and charging to a lower % on a daily basis is supposed to extend the capacity.

4. Batteries charged to maximum capacity are more susceptble to breakdown of the internal electrolyte / separator layers and self destruct.

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Years and years ago, some of the bicycles ( not mine as we couldn’t afford them) had what we called magnetos or dynamos that would run lights for night driving. I guess now days they are called alternators. Do electric cars have something similar to help charge the batteries? 

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Regenerative braking.  The first level of braking engages a generator.  With further braking effort the disk brakes engage.

When I drove a hybrid I got very good at planning my stops and using only light brake pressure to the point that at 80,000 miles I got a call from my mechanic telling me that two of my brake calipers were completely frozen with rust.  I never noticed a thing.

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10 hours ago, Mark J said:

Interesting.  This is so contrary to the wisdom of the NiCad days.  I wonder that cell phones don't have a 90% stop point on charging.  

They probably do. The "100%" indicator on screen can mean anything the designer wants it to.

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Yardwork all day. Mowing the pastures took a while because I had let the grass get 2’+. Then some work on our landscaping and bushes and shrubs, and made a little more headway clearing a trail to our creek. 
 

Going to sneak in a few minutes of woodworking while my wife and kids are out of the house.

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6 hours ago, Chet said:

When you post photos of chores around the house only Cody is presenting the picture, Hmmm? ;)

Are you going to mill up any of it? 

Well, somebody has to snap the photo!

I'm going to try to mill it, but no promises. It's just red oak, after all. Might be able to hack enough for a slab table out of it, though. If I can manage to dry it well enough.

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I can't speak to Ross's soil, but here in Middle Tennessee, we have clay for soil.  In lower valley's the soil looks great, but in the flatter areas, ..clay.      75% of the private homes that were built here before the 1990's were clay brick, and still standing.  There are older neighborhoods with nothing but brick homes.  In order to get a good garden space, $$$$$$ for compost, manure anything that will build soil.   I use all that plus Sheet composting.   Which is a 6", 8" or 10" layer of leaves spread over your garden space in the Fall when the leaves fall and let Ma Nature break them down and in the spring till it all into the soil.  It breaks up the clay and holds moisture.

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Drew, I wouldn't call that "topsoil" by any stretch. It is mostly clay, and no, it doesn't grow stuff very well. All my digging required a pick, its almost like concrete. The crew was using a bob-cat mounted auger, and had to switch to hand work because the auger couldn't penetrate.

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1 hour ago, legenddc said:

Dang, I bet that was some frantic digging too! 

Yeah, I'm glad today's crew is led by Juan. I got to familiar with Manuel yesterday.

Manuel Labor, that is...

Between removing gravel from the flowerbeds and digging out that pipe, I think I shoveled close to 5 tons of material.

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4 hours ago, wtnhighlander said:

Drew, I wouldn't call that "topsoil" by any stretch. It is mostly clay, and no, it doesn't grow stuff very well. All my digging required a pick, its almost like concrete. The crew was using a bob-cat mounted auger, and had to switch to hand work because the auger couldn't penetrate.

I know that kind of ground all too well.  We have to wait for the right amount of moisture in it to even put in a fence post.

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10 hours ago, JohnG said:

Felt good to have some shop time, and to finally make more headway on this project. Just need to cut the french cleat and hang it now.
 

John I must have missed it... what will you display in it? Looks great!

 

 

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11 minutes ago, pkinneb said:

John I must have missed it... what will you display in it? Looks great!

It’s for my wife to store her quilting thread spools and bobbins. The brass pins are to keep them organized and in place, and can keep a spool with bobbin of matching thread together. I’ll take another pic when it’s in place and in use. 

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4 hours ago, JohnG said:

It’s for my wife to store her quilting thread spools and bobbins. The brass pins are to keep them organized and in place, and can keep a spool with bobbin of matching thread together. I’ll take another pic when it’s in place and in use. 

I'm not showing that to my wife. At least until the house painting is finished & the new master suite is done, Oh, & the raised beds for the garden. Then I'll show her the pic.

That's a beautiful way to hold thread.

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