Finishing


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  1. Rubio Monocoat

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  2. Top coat over shellac

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    • This is a great method but it depends on the ideal outcome. On all white maple even the seal coat of shellac can leave some yellowing. Coop when doing WB poly i almost always raise the grain and sand smooth. The finish goes on so fast that even with this extra step i'm still done finishing days before I would have been using an OB poly.
    • My gut was to suggest a climb cut for an 1/8" round over. That's not much material but like gee-dub mentioned it could create chip out issues. Practice climb cutting though it takes some experience to get comfortable with it. Never climb cut with a larger cut than 1/8" though, unless you really know what your doing.
    • Banding helps a lot. I use ratchet straps from home depot or lowes can't remember which one, but they were $2 each so if the weather ruins them oh well... It's nice having ratchet straps because I can tighten them as the pile shrinks. edit: They are $2.54 now. I should go grab a bunch more for the logs I have to mill in the next few days.
    • Coop over 20" you going to see maybe 1/128" or roughly 0.01" of differential movement between walnut and ash. I'd say screws would probably be good enough. When in doubt use a bigger screw hole or elongate them but your probably fine. That's also assuming you have a decent amount of humidity change between seasons which I'm not sure you do.
    • Maybe, maybe not. The wood database has shrinkage % listed for woods. If walnut and your secondary wood have a very similar shrinkage % then you will probably be fine. If they are not similar, you’ll probably have issues down the road. There are also calculators (I think Wood Web has one) that let you enter the species, width, MC range, and cut type, and it will tell you how much you can expect it to move. 
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