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15 minutes ago, drzaius said:

Those big guys are mostly in warehouse type buildings. They have several models that range from the 24' industrial looking to really nice ones as small as 42" suitable for a high end commercial or residential setting.

I think it may have been the local RV Hall of Fame. If that is where it was, that’s an overgrown show room. 

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My DIL has a sister (lives on the other side of the country) who is an extremely unfit parent, so they have taken on legal guardianship of he 7 YO son. So now I am his defacto grandfather. His other g

Just spent a very enjoyable few hours with @Ronn W when he stopped by on his way to Marc Adams woodworking school in Indiana. A great bowl of chili and some homemade sourdough bread with cupcakes for

Only because I didn't want to disappoint you, Ken, I used mesquite for trim on the doors and stiles. And to top it off, I used Lone Star pulls.

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I went to my local Klingspor woodworking store ready to buy a Festool RO sander but they were aold out of the ETS EC 150s and weren’t sure when they’d be able to get more. :(

 

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2 hours ago, JohnG said:

I went to my local Klingspor woodworking store ready to buy a Festool RO sander but they were aold out of the ETS EC 150s and weren’t sure when they’d be able to get more. :(

 

Keep looking, I love mine!

speaking of ceiling fans (a while back), does anyone know where the greatest effect from one is, in relation to say the center. How far out?

The reason for asking is that due to our add to the house, our bedroom just got bigger. Prior to, the fan was centered in the room. Now the electricians have relocated it to be in the new center and we will buy a new fan but don’t know what size to get. 

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That’s the intent but how much bigger? I think the bedroom is now 14’6” x 14’6” with the fan centered and we sleep with the fan going, year round. Is the max air output at the blade tips or where? Both of us have to have the fan going. It’s a bitch trying to go to sleep at a hotel without a ceiling fan when we travel! 

Oh, and it’s an 8’ ceiling, if that matters? 

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1 hour ago, Coop said:

Now the electricians have relocated it to be in the new center and we will buy a new fan but don’t know what size to get. 

See my post on the previous page Coop :)

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On 1/6/2021 at 5:37 PM, drzaius said:

I installed a small ceiling fan today. 24' diameter, 10 airfoils, 600V, 3 phase.

 

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We used to have some similar sized fans in the mill where I work, but after about 6 months, they grew a heavy 'fur coat' of oily mill scale dust and stopped turning. Getting a lift in to clean them required operations to shut down, and heavy steel plates laid on the floor to support the lift, so it never got done.

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2 hours ago, wtnhighlander said:

We used to have some similar sized fans in the mill where I work, but after about 6 months, they grew a heavy 'fur coat' of oily mill scale dust and stopped turning. Getting a lift in to clean them required operations to shut down, and heavy steel plates laid on the floor to support the lift, so it never got done.

Depending on the environment, those big fans definitely need maintenance. There's a chain of fitness clubs here that has the 10 or 12' fans & they had a couple of them burn out after only a few years. They had accumulated so much fur, like almost an inch thick on the leading edges, that the drag was over working the motors. Now they have us go in once a year to clean & do maintenance on them.

I've never seen fans get so dirty in other buildings. I think that all the workout activity releases lots of textile fibers into the air.

But access to them is pretty straight forward, just need a lift & maybe move a couple of treadmills out of the way.

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14 minutes ago, Chris C. said:

Ha! Didn't even look at the date. How big a dork do I feel like now!?! :lol:

No worries. Just didn’t want to get your hopes up. Costco is the cheapest I see currently. 

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7 hours ago, Chris C. said:

Ha! Didn't even look at the date. How big a dork do I feel like now!?! :lol:

Happens quite often. You weren't the first and won't be the last.  I've done it myself.:wacko:

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I got a new wrist brace that actually does something. I think i figured out what injury I have, the pain was on the outside of my wrist so that limits the options to a TFCC tear or a tendon issue on the Ulnar side. Either way the brace greatly reduces the pain.

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So back to work I went. Megan and I were sick of having to reinstall rusty nasty shower curtain rods hat kept falling because the tension mechanisms are never strong enough. So we have been installing hard mounted stainless steel rods. They are nice. I could probably do pull ups from the shorter ones. Drilling on tile SUCKS though... the 4 holes for 1 rod takes me the better part of an hour.

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Drew, what kind of tile are you having that much trouble drilling holes into?

Institutional kitchen wall tiles are the hardest I’ve found to drill into. But even those we’ve learned to break the glaze by using the point of a slot headed screw driver and give it a whack with a hammer. After that, then a good masonry bit and hammer drill gets the job done. The glaze itself is what’s hard to penetrate.

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Was out in the shop rough turning some spalted alder that I picked up free a couple years ago. Slightly punky wood but it has some very pretty grain.

While doing this I feel something hit the top of my foot, felt kind of like a screw or bolt. So I shut everything down, start digging through the shavings, and I find two little shards of cast iron, and a hole below the tensioning arm of the banjo.

The lathe isn't even two weeks old, and the casting on the banjo failed. Not how I was hoping to start the weekend.

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Kinda lucky your foot was where it was.  Otherwise it might have been a while before you figured out what was wrong with the banjo.

If you bought the lathe from a local retailer you might be able to get them to swap out the banjo.  My Woodcraft has done similar for me.  

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When I drill holes in tile, for mounting handrails, shower rods, or whatever, I use this type of drill bit.  Amazon sells many cheap variations, but I find those are only good for one hole.  These will do maybe a dozen.  They go through pretty fast.

If I can hit a stud, I'll use it for mounting a handrail, or shower rod.  If it doesn't hit a stud, I'll use Togglers, specifically Snaptoggles.

https://www.amazon.com/Bosch-HDG12-Diamond-Hole-Saw/dp/B003TO5F4A/ref=sr_1_2?dchild=1&keywords=bosch+diamond+drill+bit+hole+saw+1%2F2"&qid=1610894946&sr=8-2

https://toggler.com/products/snaptoggle-heavy-duty-toggle-bolts-zinc-plated-carbon-steel-channels

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